The meaning of Puberty in dream | Dream interpretation


See Adolescence and Breakdown/Breakthrough Dreams.

Strangest Dream Explanations | Dream Explanations - Anonymous


Dream Of Puberty | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Puberty


BEARD

For a man, a beard in a dream signifies wealth, honor and dignity.

If it is moderately long or well trimmed in the dream, it means earning respect, rising in rank, prosperity, beauty and sovereignty.

If only the sides of one’s beard are long and not the middle section in the dream, it means that one will work to save money for someone else.

If one’s beard is too long and lacks proper trimming in a dream, it means indebtedness, distress and suffering from depression.

If it becomes long to the extent of reaching the floor in the dream, it means death.

If one’s beard grows long and thick in a dream, it means longevity or increase in one’s wealth.

If it reaches his belly in the dream, it means that he does not obey God’s commands.

If it grows longer than one’s grip in the dream, it means that one lives from the interest he earns from usury.

If the hair of one’s beard is black in the dream, it means prosperity and satisfaction in one’s life. Ifits color is greenish-black in the dream, it means extended wealth, power and rulership, unless if one is a tyrant, for the color of Pharaoh’s beard was greenish-black.

If the color of one’s beard yields to yellow in the dream, it means poverty and illness.

If its color is blondish in the dream, it means a scare.

If one grabs his own beard in the dream and ifits hair falls into his hand, and ifhe keeps holding to the hair, it means incurring financial losses then recovering them, unless one discards the hair in the dream. Pulling someone’s from his beard in the dream means inheriting him.

If one sees a young boy who has not reached the age of puberty having a beard in a dream, it means the child’s death. Ifthe child’s beard is just starting to grow in the dream, it means that he will grow to lead and command people.

If one’s beard is shallow and if it makes him look fatuous in a dream, it means payment of one’s debts or easing of his trouble or dispelling of his distress.

If one’s beard looks childish or completely immature in the dream, it means losing people’s respect. Ifthe color of one’s beard is gold in the dream, it means that he will lose some respect and perhaps half of his wealth. Seeing one-halfof one’s beard shaved in a dream means poverty. Ifan unknown young person shaves one’s beard in a dream, it means loss of dignity and injury caused by one’s enemy or competitor or someone who carries the same name.

If an old man shaves his beard in a dream, it means that he will lose his good reputation at the hand of a profiteer and an overpowering enemy. Ifone’s beard is cut off in a dream, it means financial losses valued at how far it is trimmed. Clipping what is longer than man’s grip of one’s beard in a dream means paying the due alms tax. Cutting off someone’s beard in a dream means swindling his inheritance.

A white beard in a dream means honor, dignity and good fame.

If one’s beard turns gray, leaving few black hairs in the dream, it means earning respect.

If all its hair becomes gray in the dream, it means poverty and loss of integrity. Seeing one’s wife having a beard in a dream means increase in one’s wealth or growth ofthe son’s business, or sickness of one’s wife, or it could mean that she will no longer be able to conceive children, though if she had a son, it means that he will control the entire family.

If a woman sees herself having a beard in a dream, it means losing her husband and if she is a widow, it means that she will marry a hard-working man who is compatible with her.

If a pregnant woman sees that in a dream, it means that she will beget a son, and ifshe has a quarrel with someone, it means that she will win the battle and stand for herself with dignity and courage. Plucking one’s facial hair or beard in a dream means wasting money.

If one’s beard and head is shaved in a dream, it means recovering from an illness, satisfying one’s debts or dispelling sorrow and distress. Having an extraordinarily long beard that one can spin and weave as a cloth, then sells it in his dream means that he will forge a testimony. Clipping one’s beard in a dream also means losing money. One’s beard in a dream also represents his job, business, clothing, gains and losses. Cutting off the hair of one’s beard with one’s own teeth in a dream means sufferings, distress and trouble. Swearingby the honor of one’s beard in a dream may denote either one’s truthfulness or lies, his stinginess or generosity. One’s beard in a dream also could represent his wife.

If a farmer finds the hair ofhis beard black in a dream, it means that he should start harvesting his crop.

A white beard could denote illness or frailty. Ifone’s beard in wakefulness is gray and he sees its color black in a dream, it means strength, determination, firmness, certainty, having great energy and exuberance. Ifone’s beard in his dream seems longer than the usual, it means being a spendthrift, wasting money, engaging in gambling and sportinggames, or suffering from depression, or beingtroubled by circumstances.

If a subversive and a sinful person sees himself having a beard in a dream, it means that he will repent of his sins.

If a misguided person sees himself having a beard in his dream, it means that he will receive guidance.

If a woman grows a beard in her dream, it means that she is trying to be a man, or it could mean insolence or engaging in wrongdoing.

If a child sees himself having a beard in a dream, it means longevity. Loving a beard and kissing it in a dream means lacking determination or will, regardless ifit is his own beard or ifit is someone else’s beard.

If a straw or anything sticks to one’s beard in a dream, it means hearing bad words. Shaving half of one’s beard in a dream means losing one’s source of income or loss of one’s dignity. Holding the beard of one’s uncle in a dream means unjustly inheriting him.

If a woman sees herself having a beard like a man in a dream, it means that she will never beget children, unless if she has a reddish beard as the natural color ofher hair. However, for a man, to have a reddish beard in a dream means trials and temptation and particularly if some gray hair is also mixed with it.

(Also see Face; Scissors; Shaving; Twisting a rope)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

ODOR

Smelling a bad odor in a dream means hearing bad words, or it could mean distress. Smelling odor that emanates from under the armpit in a dream means headache, nasal congestions, cold, or hearing bad news, divulging secrets, dispelling rancor and jealousy, or it could mean relaxing after an exhausting workday, contracting an eye disease, or it could mean loathsomeness.

If a child smells such an odor from under his armpit in his dream, it means that he has reached his puberty, or it could mean an illness or an accident that could take away his life.

(Also see Cloud of smoke; Perspiration; Smell)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

PREGNANCY

(Childbearing; Planting) In a dream, a pregnancy indicates woman’s success, diligence and assiduity in pursuing her goals. In a dream, pregnancy also means receiving recognition, respect and prosperity.

If a man sees himself pregnant in a dream, it means that he suffers from heaviness in his life, or it could represent one’s fear of exposing his problems in public. In general, pregnancy in a dream represents material gains.

If a woman sees herself pregnant in a dream, it means difficulties and adversities beside some troubling secrets she maybe hiding. However, for a learned man, pregnancy in a dream may represent increase in his knowledge, while for a craftsman, it means achieving unrivalled excellence in his trade. Pregnancy in a dream also means being madly in love, or having passionate attachment to someone, or planting seeds in the wrong place, or beingbisexual or a deviate, or sufferingfrom dropsy, or perhaps it could mean that a thief will enter his house to steal something, or to hide a stollen object, or that one may steal something and hide it from its true owner, or that he may get sick from eating spoiled food, or it could mean that he may bury a dear person, or that he is affected and a liar, or he may hide his real beliefs and show a better standing in public, or it may represent an accident or a fire. As for a woman, her pregnancy in a dream means losing her virginity before marriage, or that she will marry an unsuitable person. Ifa barren woman sees herselfpregnant in a dream, it means a bad harvest for that year, or it could mean a robbery in her neighborhood.

If an unmarried woman or a young virgin sees herself pregnant in a dream, it means that she will find a compatible husband. Pregnancy in a dream has many meanings. In a dream, woman’s pregnancymeans wealth, and man’s pregnancy means pain and sorrow. However, generally speaking, pregnancy in a dream also could mean prosperity and material success.

The extent of wealth is measured by the number of months of such pregnancy and the size of one’s growth in the dream. This is true whether it is a man or a woman in the dream.

If a young boy who is under the age of puberty sees himselfpregnant in a dream, it represents his father, and if ayoung girl who is under the age of menstruation sees herself pregnant, then it represents her mother.

If a man sees his wife pregnant in a dream, it reflects his desire for material success.

If one sees his pregnant wife delivering a baby boy in a dream, it means that she will give birth to a girl and the opposite maybe true, except if it is common for the person in the dream to experience in wakefulness what he sees in his dream.

If one sees himself delivering a baby from his mouth in a dream, it means his death, or it could mean that he will use poised and pleasant words in a conversation with someone he is careful not to offend.

If a man gives birth to a baby boy in a dream, it means that he will carry a heavy burden then escape from it, or it could mean that he will vanquish his enemy, or it could mean that he may escape from a treacherous woman.

If a pregnant woman sees herself delivering a child in a dream though having not had sexual intercourse with her husband, it means that she will discover a hidden treasure. Apregnant animal in a dream denotes benefits or profits.

(Also see Carrying someone; Delivering a baby; Transformation)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

CEREMONY, RITUAL

Example: ‘A ritual began whereby a laige knife was drawn and a few deep cuts were made to both our faces. I put my hands to my face and saw them covered with blood, crying and crying’ (OS). Similar to initiation. In the example the girl is with her boyfriend; she may thus have been ‘initiated’ into sexual activity, sex with her boyfriend has changed her image of herself.

A ritual depicts important change, such as entrance into puberty; deeper levels of oneself; new attitudes or skills; just as marnage is an entrance into a new type of life and social situation. From the wider sense of self our unconscious has, things are seen as important which consciously we feel are trivial.

A ceremony in a dream brings such things to our atten­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

CROSSING

A change, but often with much vulnerability; an obstacle, usually of a feeling nature, to overcome. Maybe fear or uncertainty causes us to be unable to make the change, so we dream of a bridge giving way. Such changes often are to do with major life junctures, such as from youth to adulthood, prepuberty to adolescence, single to married, young to middle age. Sometimes it can be a trial or test such as initiation. Crossing a river or chasm: feelings about death. See bridge; river; road; individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

EARTHQUAKE

Insecurity; the breakdown of opinions, atti­tudes or relationships which seemed so dependable. May also show great inner change and growth which makes us feel uncertain of our ground’.

The growth from youth to puberty may be felt as an earthquake, as also maturity to middle age. See earth. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

RECURRING DREAMS

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same.

It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SCHOOL

The learning process; what we leamt at school—not lessons but interrelationships, class structure, competitive­ness, authority, mortification, group preferences, etc.; habits of behaviour or feeling reactions developed during those years— puberty occurs at this time, and confronts us with many new feelings, choices and drives. Schoolfriend: your own attitudes developed in school, as you are meeting’ them in the present. School clothes: social attitudes or moral rules leamt at school.

Example: ‘1 am back at school on the first day of the new school year. At this point it can vary slightly, but I always feel out of place, usually because I am older than the other girls now or—most common—because my uniform is incorrect and it is time for assembly—I went to a very strict convent school. There is always some feeling of panic and quite often loneliness’ (PH). PH is still uncomfortable about who she is as a person.

The influence of the school years still nags at her, that she ought to be other than she is. Not having a nature that easily conformed, she was led to feel isolated and an alien.

Places in school: particular abilities we have. Library, our knowledge and learning ability; stored information. Gymna­sium: taking risks in learning something new; daring; physical health. Classroom: study, relationship with authority.

Example: ‘In the bathroom area, a school class was being held, so I had to wait for my bath, steam would be bad for the books. I didn’t have any soap with me but I was going to wash my hair and could use the shampoo’ (Leonie K). Leonie is getting rid of attitudes or a self image developed at school, shown as shampooing her hair.

The new attitudes of letting off steam would not have been acceptable at school.

Idioms: of the old school; tell tales out of school, old school tie; well schooled. See schoolteacher under roles. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

HERO / HEROINE

A well-known desire for acceptance and validation, even if you are the hero or heroine yourself.

If you see a hero, it would indicate that you are hoping for help, but pettiness is involved. Adventuresome, craving for admiration, exaggerated and immature masculinity and femininity; but also vitality and the ability to succeed, similar to Hammer.

It may also mean the opposite—that you feel like a failure—or you must be in control of everything. Dreams about heroes belong usually to so-called “big dreams,” which take place in a person just prior to puberty, during midlife crisis, or before dying.

According to Jung, the hero is one of the important archetypes.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

TOILET

The zone of the root chakra, where the Kundalini resides. This image may point to the relief of undigested leftovers, problems one has worked with.

The suggestion here is to “let go.”

From time immemorial, the toilet has been seen as a dark and scary place—in dreams, all places connected to natural functions are demonized.

It is the place of forbidden sexuality—self-gratification and homosexuality—a place full of danger and frightening activities.

It is a place where ghosts and devils do their bad deeds, and the reason why toilets in the past were always outside.

It is a place of taboos, of secrets and forbidden things, a place where budding sexuality and puberty fantasies run amuck.

This dream image also expresses the finality of nature. On one hand, it addresses everything that is transitory and points out that everything material will pass on and has no value. On the other hand, it addresses the meaning of accomplishment, completion. It is, again, an example of the alchemistic idea that gold can be made out of feces. In one sense, the toilet is the place where products are transformed. Such dream images almost always point to a necessary change: you must let go of something, while, at the same time, you must produce something positive. In Norse fables, King Olaf warns his guests not to go to the toilet alone during the night, because they might end up in a dangerous adventure with the Devil.

The toilet has also been considered the place of ghosts.

According to Jung, it is the place of the highest creativity.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

DEATH

1- Traditionally to dream of death indicated the possibility of a birth or a change in circumstances in one’s own life or that of people around. Because in the past death held great fear, it also represented calamity, in the sense that nothing would ever be the same again. It was something that had to be experienced and endured rather than understood. In these present times, as peoples’ attitudes change, death in a dream indicates a challenge we must confront. We need to adjust our approach to life and to accept that there can be a new beginning if we have courage.

2- On an intellectual level we are becoming conscious of potentials we may have missed or not expressed fully and because of this we are no longer able to make use of them. We need to be sensitive to our ability to resurrect these talents.

A change of awareness is taking place, and we may be going through some ‘rite of passage’ such as puberty to adulthood, maturity to old age and so on.

3- The unseen aspect of life; omniscience, spiritual rebirth; resurrection and reintegration.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

DOOR

also see Buildings

1- A door in a dream signifies a movement between two states of being. It can represent entry into a new phase of life, such as puberty or middle age. There may be opportunities available to us about which we must make deliberate decisions.

2- If the door in the dream is shut or difficult to open, it indicates we arc creating obstacles for ourselves, whereas if the door is open we can have the confidence to move forward.

3- Spiritually a door represents the sheltering aspect of the Great Mother (See Introduction).... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

FRONTIER

also see Border

1- To dream of crossing a border or frontier from one placc to another represents making great changes in life, actively instigating a change from one state to another, perhaps taking ourselves from the past to the future, or causing other people round us to make those changes.

2- Psychologically when we cross from one way of life to another such as changing from puberty to adulthood or from middle age to old age we need to depict this by creating an actual marker. In dreams for a frontier to appear is crossing a barrier within ourselves.

3- Spiritually, we have a new experience ahead of us which we can use on our way towards enlightenment.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

SEVEN

The Seven wears a halo—in mythology as well.

The week has Seven davs. four times Seven is the month of the moon. There are Seven deadlv sins and Seven virtues. Seven is the symbol for Neptune. Seven-people long for adventure—from pure lust and traveling and discovery, to cultivated, intellectual pleasures. They love company, but deep down they are loners with curious interests (mysticism, philosophy, religion, and art). ‘They have a strong intuitive sense and great imagination, which often appears reserved or introverted.

The mind rules over matter, and the soul fascinates them just as much. Their strong sensibilities often lead them to become mystics—or daydreamers.

Generally speaking, the Seven often hides inner or universal vibrations. Human development is divided into Seven stages (childhood, adolescence, puberty, etc.). Chinese medicine speaks of Seven energy centers.

The Seven is also connected to colors and notes. See Neptune.

Seven-people have birthdays on the 7th, 16th, or 25th day of the month.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

BLOSSOM

Dreams of a blossom symbolize that opportunities are coming into fruition and expansion in your career and/or relationships. See Bloom, Adolescence and Puberty.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

DEATH

Psychological / emotional perspective: On an intellectual level we are becoming conscious of potentials we may have missed or not expressed fully and because of this we are no longer able to make use of them. We need to be sensitive to our ability to resurrect these talents.

A change of awareness is taking place, and we may be going through some ‘rite of passage’ such as puberty to adulthood, maturity to old age and so on. Our own death can often be used in dreams to explore our perception of others’ feelings about us.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

DOOR

Material aspects: A door in a dream signifies a movement between two states of being. It can represent entry into a new phase of life, such as puberty or middle age. There may be opportunities available to us about which we must make deliberate decisions.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

FRONTIER

Psychological / emotional perspective: Psychologically when we cross from one way of life to another – such as changing from puberty to adulthood or from middle age to old age – we need to depict this by creating an actual marker. In dreams, for a frontier to appear it means crossing a barrier within ourselves. Initially a frontier was a military term signifying the front line of foot soldiers, so the idea of strategy and planning is appropriate.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

SWORD

(1) The symbolism may be phallic.

(2) The sword may symbolize consciousness. In what Jung called the first stage of individuation, beginning at puberty, the conscious ego must free itself from the previously all-embracing unconsciousness, in order that the individual may fulfil his or her particular destiny. What the conscious ego has to ‘slay5 is not the unconscious as such, but its ‘devouring-mother5 aspect; and once that is done, the ego must treat the unconscious with respect and cooperate with it. (Compare folktales which depict a hero slaying a dragon with his trusty sword. The same theme appears in those myths of creation in which the creator-god wrestles with and slays the female monster in the primeval ocean and so brings order out of chaos.) See also Dragon, sections (2) and (3).... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

ADOLESCENT

Time of puberty; changes in physical and sexual awareness due to heightened kundalini power. Emotional growth goes more slowly. General confusion because of rapid changes and increased energy in the body; emotions and judgment are thrown off. To dream you are an adolescent when beyond those years may mean you are behaving like an adolescent, using poor judgment, going up and down emotionally; also, may mean a need for awakening and integrating sexual awareness. (The kundalini power kicks up again with great force at the time of menopause for both men and women.)... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

FATHER

The interpretation of a dream whose central image is your father depends largely on the relationship that you have with him in real life. At a simple level, maybe the dream is offering you a bit of “fatherly” advice that you should consider. Or perhaps it refers to the masculine aspect of your personality, encouraging you to be more energetic.

If the father of the dreamer was ineffective as such, the dream may refer to an unconscious search for the father figure. However, if he was too strict, perhaps the dream is warning you not to repeat this behavior with yourself or with your own children. To dream of the death of your father may reflect your desire to break family ties and start being more independent. The father represents command, laws, and rules. In dreams, usually he appears through figures like a king, an emperor, a wise old man, the sun, or a weapon. Therefore, it symbolizes the world of moral precepts and prohibitions that restrain instincts. Thus, in dreams, the father often embodies traditional morality and the principle of authority.

It is no wonder, then, that in adolescence (formative period) it is very common for dreams of the father to appear, often as a hostile, tyrannical figure. According to Jung, this symbol played a crucial psychological role in the development of the individual. In contrast to the mother, which is the protection, security, and tenderness, the father symbolizes values closely linked to the masculine: risk, adventure, struggle, effort, rational inquiry, calculation, etc. In this respect, Freud emphasized the importance of the ancient Greek myth of Oedipus.

If the subject could not be separated properly from parental influence, it triggered a complex. According to his theories, in childhood (especially four to seven years) children experience a stage of incestuous desire for the mother. The complex arises when they do not overcome this stage and begin to harbor feelings of resentment, seeing the father figure as a rival to defeat. However, the Oedipus complex usually resolves itself during puberty. (See EAGLE, AUTHORITY, SWORD, FIRE, LIGHT, and TEACHER)... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

FATHER

The father represents the archetypal symbol of worldly authority and competence. For a man to dream of a father figure suggests that he may be searching for a role model, whether negative or positive. According to Freud, dreams that feature hostility towards the father figure could be explained by the Oedipus complex. Freud claimed that the ancient Greek myth of Oedipus was a symbolic representation of the psychological development of the male individual. He thought that children between the ages of four and seven went through a phase during which they developed an incestuous desire for the parent of the opposite sex; a young boy would therefore have feelings of resentment towards his father, whom he saw as a rival. Normally the Oedipus complex resolves itself by puberty, but in Freud’s view, the failure to achieve freedom from parental influence could result in the Oedipus complex lasting into later years.

If it does, it should be fairly apparent from the content of some of your dreams, especially if you are attacking, insulting or feeling envious towards your father.

Jung also believed the symbol of the father played a vital psychological role in waking life. He thought that a man dreaming of hostility towards his father was a positive sign, as it showed that the unconscious was dethroning the father so as to enable the dreamer to achieve a sense of self and be a person in his own right. A woman dreaming of a father figure is often dreaming of the pattern upon which all her future relationships are based; her dreams may encourage her to work out a more appropriate way to have mature relationships. The more difficult the relationship with her father, the harder this may be.

For men, a father may represent the conscience, or in Freudian terms, the superego.

If this is the case, bear in mind that your father’s prohibitions and commands will probably represent either conventional moral options that may lack relevance to your true nature or ‘destiny’, or irrational fears and feelings of guilt that began to take shape in early childhood. Of course, a dream about your father may simply express your current feelings for him and issues surrounding your relationship with him. The presence of your father may be a straightforward representation of him, or of the way you see or remember him. In any case, the reason for your father appearing in the dream will be shown by the part he plays in the dream story. For example if, in the dream, your father features as a protector, it may be that you need to ‘grow up’ and rely on your own resources.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

FLOWERS IN BLOOM

Flowers that are blossoming in dreams may symbolize the flowering of an idea or new relationship, or that a new phase in your life has begun. According to Freud, flowers are a female symbol, because of their cup-shaped blossoms and because a bee enters them in order to fertilize them. A flower in male dreams may therefore represent women in general or a particular woman. They can also represent an idea that has been fertilized in your mind. Pink or white blossom may also be a symbol of innocence in a dream and if the image of blossom fluttering down to the grass appears, this may signify the passing of innocence. When interpreting your dream, remember that a bloom is a plant’s reproductive structure, the carpel containing the female reproductive organ, and the stamen the male. So if your dreaming mind focused on a flower, the reference may also be sexual. And if the flower that bloomed in your dream was one that you recognize, its personal or symbolic meaning may have further relevance for you in waking life.

If, in your dream, the flowers were particularly colorful, this signifies kindness, compassion, gentleness, pleasure, beauty, and gain. Your dream may be an expression of love, joy and happiness. The colors of your dream flower may also be significant, as would their shape. Alternatively, dream flowers may denote a particular time, season or day of special significance to the dreamer or may relate to a specific sign of the Zodiac (see box on page 247). Keywords: Symbolic of beauty and inner development, puberty, coming into flower, seeing the beauty in a situation, violating, plundering or removing innocence and beauty from something, deflowering it, a homonym for flour.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

INTERCOURSE

Your longing for sexual adventure that isn’t expressed in waking life may attempt to express itself in your dreams.

If you have sex with other people in your dream, this doesn’t mean you are dissatisfied with your partner; we all have secret longings and it is healthy to express them as you sleep.

If you had a dream in which you were having sex and you are a teenager or young adult, this is perfectly normal. Adolescents frequently dream of sex, partly because the onset of puberty causes sex hormones to flood the body awakening sexual curiosity.

Such dreams are caused by these natural physiological stimuli, combined with feelings of anxiety or excitement about what making love is like. Sexual frustration is another reason why you may have erotic dreams. The sexual drive is extremely powerful and if you are not in a sexual relationship or have not had sex for a long time with your partner, your unconscious may find release in your dreams.

Similarly, if you are having unsatisfying or boring sex in real life, you may have a dream in which you have passionate and exciting sex, giving you an insight into your true sexual yearnings.

If you have low self-esteem, your unconscious may also try to boost your sense of self-worth by depicting you making love to a sexy stranger.

If you dreamed of making love to someone you know in waking life, you may be unconsciously or consciously attracted to that person or your unconscious may again be boosting your self-esteem by conjuring up such images. This is particularly the case if your dream lover is a celebrity or a person countless people have a crush on in waking life.

If none of the above applies to you, dreams in which you are making love to someone you know or don’t know could, according to a Jungian interpretation, depict your union with the anima or feminine aspects of your character if you are a man, or the animus or masculine traits within you if you are a woman. Your dream may have symbolized the complete integration of your masculine and feminine qualities or a longing for a part of yourself that has been lost. The other character in your dream—the sexual partner—represents the closest you can get to that part and helps you understand what your deepest needs are. Another interpretation suggests that dreams in which sex is the theme are referring to your creative powers, although not necessarily fertility, and the use you could be making of them in waking life.

Because semen is a symbol of masculinity and of physical and sexual maturity, dreams of ejaculation or emission can suggest the nature of your attitude to sex and the conflicts which arise in you.

If you dream of seducing someone or being seduced yourself, this suggests that you make compromises too easily in both business and love, and you should not commit yourself so cheaply. To dream of undressing in front of your dream partner suggests confidence, but to be shy or reticent to reveal yourself naked suggests body- image concerns. Having sex fully dressed in a dream suggests feelings of guilt; to dream of being naked or your genitals being exposed in public suggests feelings of sexual insecurity. It can also suggest indiscretion in your waking life, whilst deformed genitals warn against over-indulgence. See also BODY.... The Element Encyclopedia

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TEENAGERS AND DREAMING

By the time a boy or girl reaches puberty, their sleep patterns and dreaming closely match those of an adult. Just like an adult, they spend about twenty-five per cent of the time in REM sleep and are biologically and intellectually able to dream the most fascinating dreams. There is a great deal going on in the life of a teenager; there are many challenges, self-doubts and new responsibilities. Just as a teenager’s body is undergoing huge physical changes, a teenager’s emotional world is also changing, the developmental task at this age being to form a solid identity.

All this is exciting and stimulating but most teenagers feel anxious and vulnerable too. Not surprisingly nightmares increase during adolescence, but often parents are not aware of them because teenagers do not talk about them. Adolescence is a time of introspection and self-assessment, so although your teenage child may be unwilling to discuss their dreams, they might enjoy keeping a dream journal that records significant dreams and explores possible meanings.... The Element Encyclopedia

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DIFFERENT TYPES OF DREAMS

“The interpretation of dreams is the real path to knowing the soul.”
SIGMUND FREUD

Clear and personalized messages Before jumping in to discover the hidden messages that filter into our dreams and appear in the dictionary in the second part, it’s best to keep in mind that not all oneiric thoughts can be analyzed with the same pattern. Therefore, psychologists and analysts distinguish between three classes of dreams:

  • Readjustment dreams
  • Satisfaction dreams
  • Premonitory dreams
In the interpretation of dreams, we work from the base knowledge that the same subject can have very different meanings depending on the circumstances and personal situation of the dreamer. Because of this, this dictionary offers abundant explanations (psychological and esoteric) from very distinct viewpoints, although the boundary is often blurred. This is meant to show the melting pot of possibilities for discovery and prediction if one atunes their sensitivity and perceptiveness in each interpretation. But back to this chapter, where we have compiled a series of recurring themes as examples, and touch on erotic dreams, another way in which the subconscious offers information to be analyzed. Although these belong in the group of satisfaction dreams, their details warrant a separate explanation. Readjustment dreams In this type of dream, the oneiric images are provoked by merely physical causes. Readjustment dreams can be of internal origins—that is, generated by the body due to factors such as indigestion or a headache—or of external origin—heat, noises, the feel of sheets on the body, etc. A typical example of a readjustment dream with external origin would be that of a person who, due to the weight of the blankets, dreams of carrying a heavy load. Where do these types of images come from? It’s simple: when we close our eyes, we have the sensation of being isolated from the world because our consciousness of the exterior world is so linked to visual perception. However, the other senses remain in contact with the world. Therefore, even though when we sleep we appear to lose consciousness, this information continues to be collected in the brain (this is why loud noises wake us up). This is why we prefer darkness and quiet to sleep. However, we can’t always control our surroundings. When situations arise out of our control (the sound of a siren, a change in temperature, etc.), these sensory impressions become integrated in our dreams and can take surprising forms. Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, dreamt of his own death by assassination. Premonitory dreams
These oneiric episodes dream of something that will become reality in the future. In the majority of cases, these are negative dreams that tend to warn of a coming danger. As a paradigmatic example of premonition, take that of Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, in 1865. A few days before being assassinated, Lincoln saw his own death in one of his dreams. Even though this mythical case of the US president indicates the opposite, let us be clear that dreaming of a death does not necessarily imply that a tragic event is imminent.

In these dreams, death can mean many different things; for example, some psychologists interpret it as marking the end of a life cycle. This is why we insist on the importance of personalizing the dream interpretation.

Be that as it may, premonitions tend to be hidden in a symbolism that is difficult to decode, since it does not refer to past experiences. They are messages that try to warn us of dangers that face us on the physical or emotional plane. For this reason, eastern cultures have always valued them highly, as we will see later on. Satisfaction dreams Satisfaction dreams constitute the basis for the main theories of oneiric interpretation. They deal with those images in which we fulfill the desires that we cannot satisfy while awake. Therefore, this huge category includes everything from erotic dreams to the worst nightmares. In some cases, a certain satisfaction dream may repeat for years. This means that the person’s subconscious is warning them of the importance of something they may be trying to ignore. The part of this book dedicated to interpretation refers to this type of dreams.

Sexual dreams are not necessarily the result of accumulated sexual tension that needs to be released, but rather they usually refer to inner conflicts and hidden needs, or a desire to enjoy sex more freely.
Sexual dreams There are dreams that have the capacity to excite us, intrigue us, make us tremble, embarrass us . . . These are the ones that we never, or almost never, share with others. These are erotic dreams that, generally speaking, have nothing to do with the social or sexual conduct of our waking lives.

“Dreams manifest the desires that our consciousness does not express.” Sigmund Freud

Erotic dreams join other sensations that, in waking life, we probably wouldn’t relate immediately with sex. Therefore, these dreams, which could be violent, passionate, perverse, romantic, etc., tend to refer to inner conflicts and hidden emotional needs. Therefore they belong to the classification of satisfaction dreams.

On some occasions, they reveal a fear of intimacy or warn against certain relationships. In others, they illustrate situations and behaviors that we cannot normally exhibit. The dream represents everything through symbols or a strong sexual connotation. Its themes and languages, often dark, can confuse us or make us doubt because each individual has their personal symbols (just like with other types of dreams). It’s interpretation, therefore, should be performed according to the situation of the individual.

Dreams are escape routes for sexual impulses that social conventions repress; in erotic dreams everything seems permissible, so they are the best way to bring our most secret emotional desires to light. For Sigmund Freud, dreams manifested the desires that our consciousness does not express, and that was all.

Dreams contain valuable information about ourselves. But their meaning is often far from what it seems.

On occasion, erotic dreams illustrate situations and behaviors that we can’t experience in real life, whether it is due to social convention or our own beliefs. These sexual dreams act as an escape route for repressed impulses.
Therefore, it’s important to pay attention to them because they contain valuable information about ourselves. However, their meaning is often far from what it seems. They may just as well symbolize tension in our daily lives as the desire to have a good time. Erotic dreams and fantasies Erotic dreams are also related to a person’s physical and emotional development. During puberty, for example, these kinds of dreams are very common. Others that are more unpleasant are related to episodes of abuse or sexual assault. In some form or another, almost everyone has had some type of erotic dreams because at the end of the day, they are natural occurrences that are part of our lives.

They deserve our time and attention. For example, it’s important to discover when they refer to sexual issues and when they refer to other aspects, because erotic dreams often bring us valuable clues about intimacy with a partner. If something is not right in the relationship, they probably indicate the path to resolution. There should not be any difference between the erotic dreams of men and women, just between different people. However, various studies done in the United States have demonstrated the opposite. While women usually have erotic dreams with someone they know and go all the way from flirting to coitus, men dream of anonymous kinky women that succumb to their fantasies. Obviously this is not always the case, but it is undeniable that a personal relationship is highly valued in the feminine psyche. The masculine, on the other hand, opts for pleasure and domination.

The education one has received, the latent sexism of the collective subconscious, and that of the media are all factors that dreams cannot bypass. These dreams can provoke even decisive, strong women to feel more vulnerable during dreams. Fortunately, as our customs are changing, the dissimilarities between masculine and feminine erotic dreams are gradually shrinking.

Finally, erotic dreams, like all dreams, can hide fears, anxieties, and needs that you repress due to inhibitive situations or a lack of time to face the problem. With the interpretation of erotic dreams, we can find many clues to understand our emotions better.

While men dream of anonymous kinky women succumbing to their fantasies, women usually dream of erotic encounters with men they know.
Dreams of duality: masculine-feminine
Dreams of duality are those that refer to our double identity: masculine and feminine. These dreams translate the union of our two elements: animus and anima, two notions defined by Jung that appear constantly in dreams. The majority of these oneiric episodes are characterized by the denial or rejection of one of the two parts of our being—and what each one represents—creating a tension or internal conflict that can even show through in our personality. In order to help us regain balance, the dream tries to make us understand how and why we’ve forgotten the other side of ourselves.

In this way, when a man dreams that he is a woman, the message is not necessarily about a conflict of identity or sexuality; more likely it refers to a lack of attention to the more sensitive, intuitive side of his personality. Equally, when a woman sees herself as a man in her dreams, her subconscious may be appealing to her more energetic and rational side.

Dreams in which the left (feminine) or right (masculine) side of our bodies are hurt or immobilized (for example, an arm or leg) warn us that we are repressing or denying our masculine or feminine development. It is difficult for us to accept our duality and we reject this aspect that we don’t know how to express. Dreams of houses
The great oneirologist of ancient times, Artemidorus of Ephesus (second century BC) said: “The home is us”; and the most recent research on oneiric content confirms it. Buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. Therefore you must pay attention to all the details that appear, which give you reliable hints about your desires, fears, worries . . . Each place and element of the house refers to a personal aspect of the self; the kitchen represents our spiritual or intellectual appetite; the oven is the alchemic place of transformation; the basement represents the accumulation of riches; the bedroom, conjugal difficulties, etc.

However, dreams in which different rooms appear can also refer to different areas of real life. If, for example, you find yourself cooking in a kitchen, it may be a reference to a plan that you are “cooking up” in real life. If you find yourself locked in a dark basement, perhaps you feel guilty about something and think you deserve a punishment. Lying in a bed or on a sofa can be a sign that you need a break from your exhausting daily routine.

When the doors of the dream house are shut tight or covered with brick, or there are signs on doors to the rooms prohibiting entry, you should ask yourself what is blocking your evolution in real life. It may be part of your own personality or some basic inhibition.

The buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. “The Splash” (David Hockney, 1966).
Many people dream that they discover new rooms in houses that they know well. In general, this points to unknown aspects of their personality that are about to come out; but it can also indicate that they are ready for a new intellectual challenge.

The feelings that emerge when we find ourselves inside an oneiric building are very significant. If you feel brave and curious while exploring every nook and cranny of the house, it means that you are not afraid of what you may discover about yourself, you act assuredly, and face your problems with confidence. On the other hand, if you feel afraid it is a sign of inhibition and insecurity.

A pleasant, organized room reflects mental order and spiritual serenity. If it doesn’t have windows, it is a sign of isolation, fear, and insecurity. “La habitacion” (“The Room”) (Van Gogh, 1889).
Nightmares and anxious dreams Nightmares are terrifying dreams that usually stay in our minds when we wake up. They usually occur during the REM phase and, on occasion, are so distressing that they wake you up and torment you for a few minutes. The fear is often accompanied by cold sweats, dry mouth, heart palpitations . . . and the sensation of having lived a terrible moment.

Sometimes, traumatic events that happen to us in waking life (an accident, a robbery, a sexual assault) revisit us in dreams. Our mind needs to free the tension caused by the event and it does it while our consciousness rests.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory.
These dreams typically disappear with time. If they persist, it may be a major trauma that requires professional help or, at least, and understanding friend to listen; talking about it is the first step to overcoming it.

Many cultures share the belief that nightmares are nothing more than malignant spirits that attack their victims in their sleep with terrifying thoughts. Some research on oneiric content concludes that these scary dreams are more common in childhood, and if they persist into adulthood it usually indicates a deeply rooted problem.

Research in sleep laboratories has demonstrated that often nightmares are triggered by a sudden noise, which detonates a distressing oneiric image. Therefore, for people who suffer from frequent nightmares, it is advisable to wear earplugs. Worry dreams
Dreams in which we feel worried about something are more frequent than nightmares, and sometimes the pressure we feel to resolve a problem in the dream wakes us up. Once awake, the oneiric worry may seem trivial compared to our real problems, however we should not ignore the importance of these dreams; their analysis will reveal areas of our lives that require attention or make us insecure.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory. They deal with minor preoccupations that we haven’t consciously given attention to, but our subconscious has recognized.

According to Freud, dreams that generate anxiety or worry are the result of trying to repress an emotion or desire, usually sexual. Freud also highlighted the importance of finding the source of that worry in waking life, since these worries left unattended can degenerate into worse traumas.

To analyze this type of dream you must pay attention to all the elements that appear in the episode, since it is symbolically giving you hints about what worries us.

Dreams about angels are usually messages of inner exploration. In some oneiric episodes they appear as spiritual guides and protectors that try to show us a path.
Dreams of inner exploration: forgotten babies and angels
Dreams in which forgotten babies or angels appear are very common, and meaningful for our personal and spiritual evolution. But what is the meaning of this baby that screams to be held and fed? It represents, symbolically, the spiritual seed inside of us that has been left to languish without nourishment. This sacred seed, the divine Self, the “philosophical child,” as the alchemists said. It has trusted us and we must help it grow.

Dreams about angels or spiritual entities tend to be messages of inner exploration. We see various examples collected in an “office of dreams.”

“I am in utter darkness. I am surrounded by silence and emptiness. Suddenly, a shape appears, white and slender, pure, almost surreal. The features of the face are erased. A pure oval, the svelte body, without a definable sex. There is only the impression of extreme sweetness and deep harmony; but this character causes me such an impression of abandonment that it seems like a cry for help. I wrap it in my arms and want to save it at all costs.”

This is a dream of protections, of contact with the invisible world. In this oneiric episode, the androgynous character is recognized as angelic. This fabulous vision is none other than the person’s angel showing him his ailment, found in the darkness.

In other dreams, angels appear as spiritual guides or personal guardians:

The cartoons of “Little Nemo” (Winsor McCay, 1905) always ended with the images of Nemo falling out of bed. His incredible stories revolved around his fascinating dreams.

“I had died on a golden carriage decorated with blue velvet; to my right, a feminine angel, all white, smiled at me . . . she held before me the reins of two white horses, while ahead of us, an unending path bathed in sunlight opened to us.” Travel dreams
One of the most pleasant and stimulating oneiric experiences is traveling to a far-off place and waking up with the sensation of having returned from a great vacation. Without a doubt, this often means a deep desire to travel that you have not been able to satisfy; but it can also hold other interesting readings.

On occasion, you remember precise details about places and settings you have never been to. This could be due to photographs, movies, or television reports that you’ve seen and that your subconscious has saved for some special reason.

These journeys coincide, sometimes, with moment in real life when we are about to begin something new (a change of job or location . . .). Just as the landscape and feelings of the dream can indicate our real emotions about this change, the circumstances of the trip are also revealing. If it is a bumpy trip in which it is difficult to get to your destination (because you lost the tickets or bags, or crashed the car . . .), the dream may be encouraging you to weigh the pros and cons of the situation, and warning you about obstacles ahead. Perhaps you are not mentally prepared for the change.

On the other hand, dreams about remote and exotic places are warning you that your lifestyle is claustrophobic and repressed, and that you need a change or to broaden your horizons.

The mode of transportation that you use to travel in the dream is very significant. If you travel in plane, for example, you should ask yourself if you have your feet firmly on the ground or, on the contrary, if you feel more comfortable “in the clouds.” Escapism in real life tends to appear symbolically in travel dreams. Trains are symbols of new and exciting opportunities; missing the train or letting it leave is a clear symbol of a fear of change—and the insecurity that goes along with this. The station, or point of departure, is a symbolic place of transformation. The predicament of not having a ticket or money to buy one is related to some type of deficiency. However, if you manage to arrive at the destination despite it all, the dream is reflecting a certain amount of self satisfaction.

Surrealism was a revolution. The world of the oneiric, the subconscious, the paranoid . . . become a new way of seeing and exploring life. Its influence is still seen today.... Dreampedia

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