Arthur in dream

Arthur
Bold, gracious, brave one

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Arthur • All Resources Related To This Dream Are Listed Below


The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Fimit, Juice, Trees)

Temptation to break personal taboos, or divine or societal laws. Responsible use of knowledge, skills, or wisdom.

Matters of health: How the apple looks may have a direct bearing on how you’re feeling.

Appearing abundantly on a tree: A propitious sign that speaks of realizing your hopes.

Only at the top of a tree: High ambitions that you may not be able to safely or effectively reach.

Worm ridden: If you bite into an apple to discover a worm, this means that something isn’t as good as it outwardly appears, especially someone’s ethical codes.

Arthurian: Longevity. King Arthur was taken to Avalon, the Isle of Apples, to live forever. Similarly, in Norse legends apples are used as a resurrection charm, and Hera’s Tree of Life is filled with golden apples.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depends which skin colour one has.

If white: one’s natural drives, feelings about coloured people; or if per­son is known, what you feel about them.

If black or brown: one’s own cultural feelings; same as any person’ dream.

Example: \ was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her va­gina and we both felt enormous passion. I then awoke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have refrained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/ tired afterwards. Anyway I woke very wet, yet couldn’t re­member any orgasm. I could remember some question of sex as I awoke. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual relationship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep and unresponsive. When I slept again I dreamt I was in London, had got off one bus, but was not at any desti­nation. I was standing about not making a move to find my direction. Then I began to look’ (Alfred C).

To understand this dream in some depth it is helpful to think of a sexual drive as a flow, like a river. As such it can be blocked, in which case it will seek an alternative route. Sexual energy or flow is not simply a mechanical thing, ihough; it is also deeply feeling in its connection with the most profound sides of hu­man life such as parenthood and the canng and providing for young. In the history of white people a great deal of sexual frustration has arisen out of the ideas of sin and guilt in their religion.

A view arose for the white race that the black races had an easier and less frustrating relationship with the natural —which includes not only sexuality but the body as a whole, and nature also. So when Alfred dreams of the black woman, he is meeting what is natural and flowing in himself, but which he has blocked by his will because he felt shattered after sex.

The pan about the bus shows him trying to find a direction in which his sexual feelings could move satisfyingly in connection with other people.

Unfonunately, as Jung points out in Man and His Symbols, people in modern society, whether black, yellow, brown or white, have lost their sense of nature and the cosmos as being anything other than processes without consciousness or living feeling. Jung says. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man. no snake the embodiment of wisdom. No voice now speaks to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear.’ The im­portance of such dreams as Arthur’s is that it shows the pas­sionate relationship between our personality and the pnmitive and natural.

A black person, born and bred in a modern setting, would most likely dream of a black bushman to depict their own natural drives. See identity and dreams; Africa; sex in dreams.

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: As legends and myths take on a life of their own, sometimes bearing little relationship to the original occurrence, they become somewhat sanitized and personalized to fit with the patterns of society, at any particular time. Archetypal images, such as the authoritative king (arthur), the young knight (lancelot) setting out on a journey, or merlin the magician, thus become available through these dream characters to help us understand ourselves.

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The Language of Dreams

(see Abyss, Basket, Beverages by type, Bowl, Circle, Cauldron)

Alternative womb and fertility symbol, especially if filled with liquid (see Milk, Juice, Water, Wine).

Arthurian and Druidical lore identify this emblem as the grail, the cup that signifies humankind’s connection with nature and each other.

Christian: The sacredness of life and the quality of forgiveness (the cup of Christ’s blood). In this case, do you drink freely of what’s offered you, or pour it away?

Unity. In Gypsy, pagan, and Hebrew marriage and courtship rites, people drinking from one cup link their destinies and become as one.

Refusing: Wishing to avert a personal trial that is really unavoidable (note the story of Christ in the garden of Gethsemane). Alternatively, rejecting an opportunity for friendship or camaraderie because of suspicious motivations.

In Eastern philosophy, a cup is shaped by what it contains. What metaphorical beverages do you incorporate into yourself by drinking of this cup?

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The Language of Dreams

(see Abyss, Balloon, Basket, Bowl, Cauldron, Chalice, Coins, Satellite Dish, Zero)

Wholeness, totality, centering. Halos, for example, symbolize spiritual wholeness and focus (see Light).

Freudian: A vaginal emblem or symbol of femininity due to its shape.

Equality and unity.

The round table of King Arthur’s court gave everyone an equal voice and symbolized the solidarity of Britain.

Protected or sacred space. In the first century B.C.E., magicians were sometimes called “circle drawers” because ritual magic uses this emblem to contain power. Similarly, % fairy ring safeguards its residents from mortals.

Going around in circles: Being trapped in progressively worse cycles, outmoded ideas, or a static lifestyle with little achievement.

A circle with a point in the center is a type of mandala emblem representing personal wholeness, order, harmony, and healing.

God or divine influences and protection. There is a Hindu saying that God is an unbroken circle without a circumference, being nowhere and everywhere.

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The Language of Dreams

(see Ascetic, Authority Figures, Parents, Religions)

A god or goddess: Each varies here by the specific visage seen, but ecumenically any such appearance indicates a higher consciousness, morality, and the divine spark within each of us.

Christ: An image of healing, forgiveness, protection, and renewal.

If crucified, an emblem of martyrdom, or giving too much of yourself (see Cross, Sacrifice).

Buddha: Introspection.

The path of positive speech and acting in accord.

Gandhi: Empowerment that comes from knowing your own mind.

A just cause fought for without violence. Peaceful negotiations.

A guru: Looking for, and dependence upon, spiritual insights from other people. Remember that your own heart is the best guru to guide your life.

Mother Teresa: The highly underestimated power of gentility, kindness, and compassion.

Moses: Redemption that first requires the trying of your beliefs.

A wizard: Mastery over the elements, and the ability to foresee the consequences of actions. Alternatively, a stage magician represents trickery and illusion meant to fool people.

King Arthur: Wise and peaceful leadership. Having a real understanding of equity.

Merlin: A tutorial image from your Higher Self who helps you see things differently, from a more metaphysical perspective.

Kings and queens: People, situations, or ideals in your life that have some authority over you.

The questions to ponder here are how much control do they have and how healthy is it for you? Look at other elements in the dream to determine this. Alternatively, these may be reflections of your own Higher Self, and self-rulership.

Mary: An alternative image of the primordial goddess, who through obedience and faith gave birth to the Messiah.

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Hater

1- A lagoon or lake represents our inner world of feeling and fantasy. It is the unconscious side which is a rich source of power when it can be accessed and understood.

If the lake is contaminated we have taken in ideas and concepts which arc not necessarily good for us.

A clear stretch of water would indicate that we have clarified our fears and feelings about ourselves.

2- Often thought to be the home of the magical feminine and of monsters, the lagoon stands for the darker side of femininity. This is seen clearly in the legends of King Arthur and this type of image will appear in dreams as we lose our fear of that particular part of ourselves.

3- The unconscious and the primordial substance are often pictured as a lagoon.

The Chinese concept of a kind of soup from which came all existence, links with the lagoon.

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Often thought to be the home of the magical feminine and of monsters, the lagoon stands for the darker side of femininity, and this is seen clearly in the legends of king arthur and those of the siren. This type of image will appear in dreams as we lose our fear of the depths of our own emotion.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If one could produce a graphic image of the whole of human nature, many different forms might be integrated within an overall shape, perhaps a circle or square. Also, if it were possible to have a visual presentation of a person’s inner world of mind, weaknesses, strengths, order, confusion and quality, each person would appear differently. Some would be internally jumbled, divided and ugly, others symmetrical, inte­grated and beautiful.

Because the unconscious produces dreams, and because dreams are imagery which give form to the otherwise abstract elements of internal human nature, there anse in some dreams shapes or patterns which depict an overall view of one s own inner condition. Carl Jung drew attention to the circle and square designs in some dreams, calling them man- dalas, and seeing them as representing the nucleus of the human identity. Although we are, in our everyday life, the magical and mysterious process of life, it is difficult for us actually to answer the question ‘Who am I?’ or ‘What am I?’ with any lasting conviction.

The mysterious essence of ourself is met in dreams as a circular or square object or design, as the sun, a flower, a square garden with a round pond in the middle, or a circle with a square or quartered design within it, a circle with a cross within, a revolving or flying cross-shaped object. Classi­cal symbols from all nations use this theme; and we can find it in the round table of King Arthur, in the centre of which the Holy Grail appeared; the healing sand paintings of the Na- vaho Indians, the zodiac; circle dances; stone circles; the Bud­dhist wheel of birth and death; and so on.

The circle usually symbolises a natural wholeness, our in­ner life as nature has shaped it.

The square shows wholeness we have helped shape by conscious cooperation with our m- neT world. There are two main reasons why one produces this theme in one’s dreams. It occurs in children or people meet­ing internal or external shocks, and produces a strengthening of the vulnerable identity in meeting the vaned influences they face. It arises in people who are meeting and integrating the wider life of their being existing beyond the boundaries of their usual interests, or what they allow themselves to experi­ence.

The contact with the self is then pan of an extending of awareness into what was dark or unknown, not only in our own unconscious, but in external life. In touching the nucleus of one’s being in this way, one becomes aware in some mea­sure of the infinite potential of one’s life. There is often an accompanying sense of existence in eternity and the many different mansions’ or dimensions of experience one has within the eternal. See the self under archetypes; shapes.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our name represents our sense of self, our essential T.

If name is altered: suggests a sense of change in the way we see ourself. Other people’s names: our feelings for that person; the quality we feel in regard to some­one else with the same name, or wordplay or associations with the name.

A woman dreamt a friend asks her ‘Do you know where Chris is?*; she replied he was on the back seat. On waking she realises she is being asked ‘Where’s the cri­sis?’ Two weeks later she had a kidney infection—in the back seat. Names also suggest qualities, as in Peter, the rock; or one’s friend Pat may be pleasure loving, so we use the name or person to represent that quality. See wordplay, puns.

Place names: these can represent our feelings about the place, or be similar to personal names in their suggestion of something. Example: ‘On the other side of the road was a window with my wife’s ring and watch and other trinkets. I went to pick them up but a stranger put his hand over them. I then crossed the road to get a bus to Andover’ (Arthur P). Arthur’s dream wants to make sure he gets the message by saying hand-over and Andover.

Idioms: call someone names; clear someone’s name; have a bad name; not a thing to one’s name; in name alone; in the name of; make a name for oneself; name dropper, one’s mid­dle name, name is mud; somebody who shall be nameless; or my name’s not . . . ; worthy of the name; name in vain; lend one’s name to; name the day.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One’s prevailing direction in or approach to life. This direction/approach can be either self created out of one’s own actions or decisions or arise out of other people’s or social influence; one’s predispositions; any direction you are taking, such as a love affair, a business, a new attitude; one’s public activities.

Example: My dream is of an eternal journey, which takes a road that turns into a circle or maze that is endless. Behind me is a large fat young man with blond hair. I can’t get along and he catches up with me, I say “We can’t go back we must struggle on.” He takes my wrist. I am trying to hide my fear of him and the pathway, when I wake up’ (JP). JP feels her life is something she must ‘struggle on’ with, but it is an endless circle of confusion in which she gets nowhere. This illustrates the road as a symbol of one’s approach to life. Perhaps it is her fear which creates this sense of life for her.

Example: ‘Janet my wife was cycling beside me. We came to the end of a short road. I said we should turn left, but Janet thought we ought to turn right. We got out into the middle of the road without turning either way’ (Arthur P). Crossroads, deciding which road to take: Arthur’s dream shows crossroads as depicting our many choices. Arthur’s choice involves his attempt to include his wife’s needs.

The size, richness, clean­liness, amount of people, situation of the road shows how you inwardly see either the direction chosen, or the choices con­fronting you. See crossroads.

Example: ‘Walking alone along a road through a small town. I was heading for a place that a group of people, in a street parallel to mine, were also heading for.

A person from the group tried to persuade me that the right way to get to the place was along the street the group was walking. I knew the street did not matter, only the general direction.

The person was quite disturbed by my independence. It made him or her feel uncertain to have their leader apparently questioned. I felt uncertain too for a moment. Then I walked on and came to an open stretch of ground’ (Tony C). Tony’s dream shows how roads can represent different sorts of social behaviour.

To choose one’s individual ‘road’ may be difficult, because others are so sure they know best. Patterns of behaviour such as needing an authority figure to follow are also here depicted as a road.

Road behind: the past; what you have already achieved or done. Road ahead: the future; aspects of self not yet expressed; new areas of endeavour. Fork in road: something to decide; parting from accustomed way or relationship. Unpaved road, track off to one side: going off the beaten track or being side­tracked. Lane: individual direction. Known road: one’s associ­ated feelings with that road. Running out into road: danger. Going wrong way up one way street: going against prevailing attitudes. Going out from house into road: how others see you; being in public view. Idioms: on the road to recovery, road hog; end of the road; take to the road, middle of the road; the high road to. See track.

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- A round table in a dream is a symbol of wholeness. Partly because of the tales of King Arthur, there are various mvths associated with a round table, but essentially it indicates that everyone is equal.

2- The round table is a representation of the heavens, since the twelve knights are the signs of the Zodiac (see Zodiac). In dreams we arc continually trying to create perfection and this is one such dream.

3- Spiritually the tabic suggests a centre, but one from which all things can begin.

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spiritually the table suggests a centre, but one from which all things can begin. Partly because of the tales of king arthur, there are various myths associated with a round table, but essentially it indicates that everyone is equal in status and has an equal right to express an opinion.

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Noble, fair, sincere, and mature, Sean may appear in his role as King Arthur or as Indiana Jones’ father to bnng the wisdom of a sage or the sovereign power of a king. As the archetype of the king, he may call you to your own wisdom and the dignity that comes with age For a woman, he may appear as a fair father or a mature lover.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

in dreams Although sex is symbolised in many dreams, where it appears directly it shows that the dreamer is able to accept their sexual urges and hurts more easily. What is then imponant is to attempt an understanding of what setting or drama the sexual element occurs in. Our psychological and sexual natures, like our physical, never stand still in develop­ment unless a pain or problem freezes them at a particular level of maturity. Therefore our sexual dreams, even if our sex life is satisfactory, show us what growth, what new challenge, is being met.

Example: My lover was standing behind me, and John, my husband, was standing in front of me. I was asking John to have sex with me and at the same time thinking, “Oh, hell, if he does he will think we have something going between us.” I felt no flow towards John but felt somehow I was trying to tell my lover that I was desirable’ (Sally A). Sally’s dream needs no interpretation. Such clear dreams show that Sally is ready to be directly aware of what she is doing in her relationships.

If the sex in the dream is deeply symbolised, it suggests the dreamer is less willing to be aware of their motivations or connected painful feelings. Even though Sally’s dream was clear, it was still dealing with an area of her sexuality she was not clearly conscious of.

If she had been aware, it is doubtful whether she would have dreamt it.

Example: ‘I was in a farmyard.

A small boy climbed all over the bull. It became terribly angry. It had been chained without attention too long. Now it tore away and sought the cows.

The gates were closed, but the bull smashed through the enclosing fence. I rushed to the fence and sat astride it, but on seeing that the bull smashed it like match wood, I looked around for some safe place.

The bull charged the first cow to mount it, but so terrible was its energy and emotion that it could not express as sex. It smashed the cow aside as it had done the fence. Then it rushed the next and tossed it over its head, charging and smashing the next. I climbed into somebody’s garden, trying to get out of the district’ (Arthur J). Although this dream depicts Arthur’s chained’ sexual drive using the bull, it is still fairly obvious.

If we consider the setting and plot of the dream, as suggested above, we see that Arthur is desperately trying to avoid responsibility for, or try­ing to escape, his own sexual drive—figuratively ‘sitting on the fence’.

Example: ‘My husband and I were walking down a road. We were going in the same direction together. I started to sing with a very happy feeling but then felt I should stop because he would say the happiness was because I had had sex. I sensed he knew what I was thinking as I walked along. He then quietly began to sing and the dream ended with me smiling to myself. We had sexual cut off for four weeks but had made love that afternoon’ (Joan W). In talking about this dream Joan said she felt it slightly embarrassing to admit that sex gave her feelings of happiness. She liked to believe she was perfectly happy without it. It is probably out of the slight conflict between her conscious attitude and her feeling of well-being after sex that the dream was produced. See ani­mals; adolescent; affair; devil, Christ, Shadow under arche­types; bag; banana; bed; example in bite; black person; breasts and penis under body; bud; candle; cane; castration; ceremony, ritual; clothes; compensatory theory; cuckoo; cup; dam; dance; third example in danger; defence mecha­nisms; dragon; drum; emotions, mood; ejaculation; second example under evil; founh example under husband in family; feelings; homosexuality; horns; hostility; example in door under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; insects; jun­gle; kiss, left, right; lift; second example under light; man; masturbation; mirror; murder; nest; oval; pole; prostitute; purse; rape; refrigerate; religion and dreams; first example under reptiles; sadism; sex while asleep; wordplay, puns.

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Dreamers Dictionary

Twelve is the number of the signs of the zodiac and the symbol for a complete year. Twelve months, as well as the number of disciples of Jesus. There are Twelve animals in the sign of the zodiac, Twelve knights at Arthur’s round table, Twelve chosen tribes of Israel. Twelve is a very important number.

If it is Twelve o’clock in your dream, it really is “high time”! Twelve refers to the knowledge you have gained, serving as a guide to enrich your soul. Twelve is the symbol of all that is possible, your hopes and desires, your instincts and urges, but also your higher ideals, reason, love, all doubts, and intuidon—in other words, everything that makes up a human life.

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