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Dream Fairy

Here are 30 different dream symbol that appear most common in the world and these dreams meanings.
Animals

Animals can usually be linked to survival or the instinct to keep going no matter how difficult things are. It can mean you’re holding things back that you should express. Dreams of an animal symbolize that you are connecting with your wild side, basic instincts and survival needs. Consider the type of animal. Babies

Babies most times just mean that you want to continue your life and family, and want to share your knowledge with your next of kin. They might also mean you’re holding something back. Something new comes into your life. A new idea or a new creative project at work. Symbol of new possibilities and potential for growth in multiple areas of your life. Lost

Being lost in your dreams may signify that you have lost your true purpose in life. It may point to soul loss or your disas- sociation from an important aspect of your personality. If the theme of being lost recurs, it may point to a need to seek guidance spiritually or psychologically. Naked

Dreams of being naked or seeing someone naked represent a desire for honesty and intimacy. It can also represent the fear of others knowing your private thoughts and feelings. If you are comfortable being naked, then you feel you have nothing to hide in intimacy. If you are uncomfortable, ashamed, or embarrassed, then this dream is telling you to do some ego-integration work, and begin the process of releasing your own judgments and criticisms. Trapped

If you dream of being trapped, it means that you feel confined and restricted in a friendship, career or romantic relationship. You may be feeling bad physically because of your emotional worries. This dream can also mean that your rivals will get the best of you if you are not careful. If you successfully escape the trap in your dream, you will triumph over your rivals and your relationships will improve in real life. Buildings and Houses

Building a house may signify construction of a new project in your business or building a totally new life. Building with Legos or building blocks may comment on needing to play with your ideas before putting them into action. Clothing

Clothing in general reveals the image that you want to project to the world. Each article of clothing reveals different concerns, qualities, beliefs, attitudes, and expressions Even the color and conditions of the clothing may reveal significant information.

For example, clothing that is tattered or torn may signify that you feel emotionally shredded by an experience. You may also be expressing a “poor me” attitude.

Cry

Dreams of crying symbolize that you are healing, grieving, cleansing, and releasing that which no longer supports you, as you make room for that which does support you. Consider that this might be a cry for help and that you would be wise to seek support to help you through this challenge you are going through. Keep in mind that you can’t heal what you can’t feel. Death

Dreams of death are very common in that it is the job of our subconscious mind to keep us alive, so your dreams are assisting you to process your fears of death and dying. If you dream of your own death, then you are contemplating the value and impact of your life. Dreaming of someone else dying is about transformation and change in your relationship with then, not necessarily a forecast of a literal death (though sometimes it does). You might also be venting out your fears of losing someone that you love. Often the dream of death represents the ending of chapter in a person’s life, and that a new cycle is about to begin. Keep in mind that the Native Americans believe that the most powerful way to live is as if death were always just over your shoulder. This dream is suggesting that you consider what aspect of your life is ending, how can you harmoniously participate in completing this cycle, and what new beginning is wanting to come into your life. Demons

To see demons in your dream, represents negativity and distress. It also forewarns of overindulgence. If you dream of being possessed by demons, you are feeling helpless about something. Dogs

Dogs are man’s companions and loyal “ friends and thus can come in a dream to represent a real friendship, fteca dog’s extreme loyalty to its owner, the appearance of a dog can represent a tendency toward being too loyal to-your friends and thus sacrificing yourself and your needs. A dead dog can come to represent the death of a fnendship, and the birth of a puppy can come to signify the amval of a new friendship. A bite from a dog can be a response to an argument with a fnend. Dogs as guardians can signify the need for personal protection, or they may comment that you feel watched, as by a watchdog. Drowning

Sinking into the unconscious, helplessness, lack of planning in your life. Being washed away by the flow of emotions. Fear of being swallowed up by the unconscious. As in Suffocating, where the issue is to get more air, here it is a matter of being safe in the Water, about feelings and (emotional) needs that bring more energy and inner strength. Falling

Falling in your dream may come as a response to some failure. It may comment on feelings of loss of control. It may also be a response to falling from grace or falling from your stature in life. Falling dreams may recur when you have lost a significant relationship, or have faced a personal disaster in your career, or have been diagnosed with a particular illness.

Fire

Fire is a punfying element that is destruc tive yet transforms everything eventually. Setting fire to your emotions may act as the cleansing agent of the soul. It can represent the passion that fuels the heart and the sacred ember of your sexuality. A fire in your house may relate to some anger that is destroying the peace at home. Fire may also signify destructive behavior on your part or that of another family member. Flying

If you dream you are flying so high that you can actually touch the moon and stars this portends many different types of global disaster that you may soon hear of. If you fly high with black wings you are warned that you are headed for a let down of magnitude. Flying dreams are normally a good omen and if the flight is pleasant, with no worries and anxieties, you can look for happiness and plenty to follow. Food

People often dream about food. All types of food are a consistent part of a dream life. Anything from meat to elbow macaroni comes up through our unconscious and leaves vivid memories upon awakening. Food is symbolic of a large variety of things. It could symbolize pleasure and indulgence. To the perpetual dieter, the dream could have a “compensatory” function where the food that is denied to the individual during the day shows up in the dream state. Dreams could additionally symbolize physical, mental, spiritual and emotional nourishment. Chased
““/

Being chased by shadows shows the need to escape from something previously repressed, such as past childhood trauma or difficulty. To be chased by an animal generally indicates we have not come to terms with our own passion.

Horses
““/

A horse may offer its power to the dreamer as a vehicle for moving forward in life. Horse brings the attnbute of strength to deliver you to your destination.

For the hero, the horse cames him to his mission, perhaps over long distances, and thus it may signify the need to travel. A wild horse can represent unleashed and untamed power. Horses may also trot into your dream to indicate the need to stand your ground in a power struggle.

Jumping
““/

  • The act of jumping can be somewhat ambiguous in a dream. It can indicate either jumping up attempting to attain something better for ourselves or jumping down, which can mean going down into the unconscious and those parts of ourselves where we may feel we are in danger. Jumping on the spot can indicate joy and has the same significance as dance (See Dance).
  • Repetitive movement of any sort in a dream usually indicates the need to reconsider our actions, to look at what we arc doing and perhaps to express ourselves in a different way. On a psychological level, jumping up and down in a dream may indicate being caught up in a situation without having the power to move either forwards or backwards.
  • In certain religions, spiritual ecstasy is induced by jumping. This is a way of employing the physical in order to reach the spiritual.
  • Also See: Jumping
Kiss - Kissing
““/

Affection. In this dream you may be expressing feelings that are difficult to express during the day. Kissing is usually an indication of warmth, affection, and happiness. If you don’t receive enough love and affection in your daily life, then this could be a compensatory dream, where the dreamer is comforting himself. If you are kissing the object of your affection, the dream could be a form of wish fulfillment. Superstition based interpretations say that if you are kissing strangers, you may have a need to conquer. If the kissing is insincere, you are pretentious while if you see your partner kissing someone else, you may be afraid of infidelity.

Money
““/

Money in dreams does not necessarily represent hard currency, but more the way in which we value ourselves. This symbol appearing in dreams would suggest that we need to assess that value more carefully, and equally to be aware of what we ‘pay’ for our actions and desires. If there is a feeling of self-denial in our making savings, particularly to the point of miserliness, we may not have managed our resources properly in the past and are having to suffer for it now. We may also fear the future. If someone else gives us their savings, we are able to use their knowledge and expertise.

Paralysis
““/

  • When paralysis is felt in a dream we are probably experiencing great fear or suppression. Feelings that are emotionally based are experienced as paralysis in order to highlight the physical effect those feelings can have.
  • Imagination can often play tricks on us, and we experience as real some kind of reaction we would not normally allow ourselves. Paralysis is one such reaction.
  • Paralysis can signify spiritual inadequacy, inability to create movement, and inertia. There is a condition which sometimes occurs during development when we are forced into facing our own fears, and this can be experienced as paralysis.
Pregnancy / Pregnant
““/

To dream you are pregnant signifies growth and development in your personal life. You may find that you are unprepared to act on it or to even discuss the matter with other people. It may also symbolize the birth of new ideas, projects, directions, or goals. To dream of being pregnant with a dying baby suggests an undertaking you worked hard for is suddenly doomed to fail. It denotes anxiety over things that are unfolding in ways you never expected. A pregnant woman having dreams of her pregnancy usually conveys her worries in various stages of her pregnancy. First trimester dreams are usually consists of small creatures, furry animals, flowers, fruits, and water. Second trimester dreams usually cover birth complications and self-doubt about motherhood. You may also dream of giving birth to a non-human baby. Finally, in the third trimester, you tend to dream of your own mother. When a man dreams of getting a girl pregnant, it is a warning that serious consequences may result from his sexual activities.

Prison
““/

Being in a prison may comment on feelings of being persecuted or punished for doing something wrong. A prison may also mention that you are imprisoned by your own thoughts or beliefs. Since a prison represents lack of personal freedom, it may point to a relationship that restricts your freedom, such as a bad marnage.

Sexuality - Sex
““/

Dreams of a sexual nature are very common and act both as an emotional release and a reassurance that everything is in order with your sexuality. Being intimate with a stranger is a fantasy that many people enjoy and this type of dream may indicate a wish for new experiences or experimentation. Intimacy with your partner in a dream acts as a reassurance of your love, and serves to strengthen your bond in your own mind.

Snakes
““/

The snake is a powerful dream symbol, associated with the feminine, healing and spirituality. Being bitten by a snake in a dream is actually positive, meaning you are accepting all parts of your nature as you grow into a stronger person. If you dream about you or an animal attacking, wrestling with or trying to kill a snake, you will have to defend your reputation against nasty gossip. If the attempt to kill the snake was successful in your dream, you will succeed against all hostilities.

Spiders
““/

In a dream, a spider represents a malicious woman, or a weak, perfidious and a distant man. A spider in a dream also represents a weaver, an ascetic or a monk. Ifone sees a spider in his dream, it may mean that he will meet a pious and a religious man. Weaving a web in a dream means becoming weak. A spider in a dream also could represent a pleasing wife. If one sees a spider hanging down from the ceiling in a dream, it indicates a severe winter in that area.

Teeth
““/

Hostility or an attack, such as when dream figures deliver “biting words” or “bare their teeth.” Losing teeth in a dream may reflect words said in haste, or losing the ability to speak candidly. Because this bony part of the body endures long after death, it has some associations with the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth. In this context, losing teeth might equate to losing the will to live or having your personal power taken away. Rotten teeth equate either to the fear of old age, or someone whose words are filled with so much insincere sweetness that decay in that relationship is inevitable. Having teeth pulled out represents an end to suffering that is aided by an external force.

Vehicle - Vehicles
““/

If you dream of riding in a vehicle and someone else is driving, you will soon take a business trip at your bosses convenience. If you are riding in a vehicle where you or a member of your family are driving, then your trip will be for pleasure or personal business.

Walking or Running
““/

A running dream is basically a dream of escaping a certain situation, person, or thing. If you succeed in running away from, or elude a pursuer, then you will be able to change those things in your life that has you ‘on the run’. If you dream of the desire to run but cannot get your feet to obey it shows a lack of self confidence and perseverance on your part. Try sticking to your guns and see how much your life will change.

Water
““/

It is a mirror of your subconscious mind.

The quality of water often describes the situation of your emotions. Crystal clear, clean, adulterated, calm mostly provides strong insights about the state of your feelings.

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My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you or others are adopting a child indicates that you are taking on something new and different. Ask yourself what is missing in your life that would make you happy.

If you dream that you are adopted (and you aren’t in real life), you are feeling out of place in some real-life situation. You may also suspect that those closest to you have been lying to you.

If you dream of giving up a baby for adoption, there is some aspect of yourself or your personal life that is changing, and you are feeling a sense of loss. You may have made a decision you can’t take back, or be sad or anxious about moving on to a new stage. You may also be having trouble making a new personal goal or project happen. Also see “Baby”

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Mystic Dream Book

This is a dream of contrary.

If you dream that you have been Adopted by some one, or that you have Adopted some child, it shows that some relation or close friend will appeal to you for help in some crisis.

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Formally selecting as one’s own; see “transplant”

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New American Dream Dictionary

1. If adopting a child, dreamer is accepting some proposal made in waking life, such as a new idea.

2. If child is rejected, a new idea is rejected.

3. If dreamer feels adopted, he/she is feeling out of place.

4. Not being dealt with honestly by someone.

5. Feel­ing that one wants to be adopted by and protected by someone.

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Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of caring for orphans or being welcomed into God’s family, Rom. 8:15

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

If you adopt someone in a dream, it means that relatives will soon ask for your help.

If you’re adopted in a dream, it means that enemies may soon raise their hands against you.

If you adopt children in a dream it means that you will have difficulties in your love life.

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Taking on something foreign—giving aid. Longing for the “child within.” Here you should always ask what is missing that would make you happy. What would you like to take on?

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The Language of Dreams

(see Baby, Orphaned)

If you see yourself being adopted by a group or family, this means acceptance among the people pictured, or self-acceptance with regard to your perceived roles and responsibilities to that group.

Seeing yourself alone waiting for adoption is an alternative type of desertion dream. Alternatively, this reveals insecurity about not being accepted or loved, or feeling totally out of place in your surroundings.

What exactly is being adopted? This symbol can represent an aspect of yourself— an idea or a characteristic with which you’re becoming more accepting and comfortable, thereby adopting it into your being.

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

Signifies acceptance (if you are getting adopted), rejection if you are putting someone up for adoption. Also it could mean adopting new ideas, or a need to do so.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreams give us a doorway into a strange and wonderful world. Although it appears to have many of the features of our waking world, such as peo­ple, animals, objects and places, it is nevertheless full of sub­tle surprises and differences.

To enter this world while asleep leaves us largely unaware of its possibilities.

To take waking awareness into our entrance, as happens when we explore a dream through dream processing, unfolds the magic impact of what we meet.

When we open the door of dreams in this way we begin a journey. It has stages, problems to surmount and things to learn, just like any journey. Many people have already trav­elled before us, and there are books such as Alice in Wonder­land, The Odyssey, Exploring Inner Space, and Altered States oj Consciousness which describe journeys and the terrain.

Although we might meet the heights of religious experi­ence as well as the depths of human despair on the journey, in simple terms it is primarily a journey into a confrontation with our own potential, our own fear, our own prison bars of thought and habit, our own ability to lift perception beyond what we have known before and look at the world, and our life in it, from new perspectives. It is a journey towards greater maturity in which we face the humbling vision of our own littleness, the moving encounter with the vulnerable child we once were, the cleaning out of the store cupboards of resent­ment, hurt and anger, the D1Y of conscious renewal of our identity, and the meeting with Love as we experience ourself as a living participator in the wonder of life. We look at birth, we meet death, we gaze into the vast depths of space out of which our being has arisen. Then we find ourselves seeing the faces of the other human beings we live with, and recognising we are all on the journey, and we only have each other. Real­ising we are all waves on a shoreless sea—from no port we move to no destination—we understand our self responsibil­ity, and consider what we will to do with the momentum of our life.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One of the most frequent dream themes is that of anxiety in some form. This may not be because most dreams are about things we fear, but simply because we re­member those dreams more than a bland dream. In our dreams the things we fear are only our own feelings. Of course, the dream may be about a snake, or car accident—things we fear which are not inside us. Even so, it is our feeling about the snake or situation which disturbs us, and these can change, even though the snake remains just what it is.

If we cannot meet our feelings of fear or emotional pain we are controlled or trapped by them. Sometimes we need the help of a professional therapist to meet what we fear, but many fears can be met by using simple techniques. See woljunder animal, dream processing, premenstrual tension.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

J.A. Hadfield, in his book Dreams and Nightmares (Pelican 1954), puts forward what he calls a biological theory of dreams. He says the function of dreams is that, by reproducing difficult or unsolved situations or experi­ences, the dream aids a solving or resolution of the problems. He gives the example of a man climbing a cliff who slips fractionally. He then may dream of actually falling and waking terrified. Subsequently the dream recurs, but in each he tries out a different behaviour, such as clasping for a branch, until he manages to act appropriately to avert the disaster. He sums up by saying dreams stand in the place of experience. They make us relive areas of anxious or difficult experience. They thus help problem solving. But they not only look back at past behaviour, they act just like thinking in considering future plans and needs.

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Dream Fairy

By bringing meaning to the signs, symbols, archetypes, and elements of the Upper World, whether through night dreams or collected through the synchronistic events of the waking dream, we discover that the otherworidly intersects the worldly. Symbols of a divine origin, such as angels, halos. rainhows, suns, moons and stars, bring the qualities of the Upper World of dreams into life By engaging in meaningful play with these symbolic reprc-sentations from our dreams, we may thus realize that our wodd can be traced to divine origins.

Upper World dreams deliver us into the certainty that spirit is all around us. assembled in the moment. And at any given moment our lives may take new. more positive direction if we choose to become lucid in our waking life and accept the grace around us. Enlightenment is the realization that heaven's dream is here on earth and we need not seek to leave our bodies to ascend Dreaming itself is a process of ascension.

Dreams in general are of transcendent value to the spintual- ly centered mind.

The related psychological work may even be viewed as spirit-driven. Each growth step we take through conscious dream work affects die collective unconscious, which includes every soul and every living thing The reverberation of our progress transforms the organism of the universe We may ourselves become like shamans and mediate the Upper World with the Middle World through recognizing dreams of a transcendent quality and bnnging the visions and information they communicate to those around us. By doing so, we bring inspiration and wisdom to our community of friends.

Spirituality and psychology have come together within the field of transpersonal psychology, which investigates transcendent states as an integral pan of rhe whole of an individual For the conscious dreamer, the exploration of dreams is a quest lor personal truth and spintual ccrtainty. By honoring the dreams from the Upper World as containing sacred information, one may be guided and supported toward life's fulfillment.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Although the world of business and the world of dreams are often considered to be incompat­ible, this is not so. Once one realises that dreams may be the ‘printout’ of the most shrewd and capable computer we have access to, we can see them as a source of useful information.

If one is in business, there is information in one’s own mem­ory, along with considered projects, questions about problem areas, which have never been put on an electronic computer. And there is no computer program outside our own mind which can handle and manipulate all the variables, the inte­grating of different information sources—written words, feel­ing hunches, spoken information, personal observation and experience—and then sift, explore different combinations, and reach into pure creativity by leaping into the new.

Dreams should not be seen as oracles, but if we take their information into account along with our other sources, we find them a real addition to our business equipment. See cre­ativity and problem solving in dreams.

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

These are usually a sign of much activity during the day (less often, a suggestion to be more active). In contrast, being an observer in the dream means to be less passive. These dreams may also point to too much stress, indicating that your life has become too frantic. Try to determine whether you see yourself as being very active in the dream or if you seem to be disappearing from view.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Gnffith, Miyago and Tago give 34 types of dream themes, from falling to being hung by the neck.

For the lay dreamer it is more useful to put dreams into much broader categories such as psychological. ESP, body, sexual, spiritual and problem solving. In researching the data for this book, some special cluster of dream themes were no­ticed.

For instance a cluster was noted in women past middle age, they dreamt of walking in a town and losing their hus­band. Description of these clusters can be seen in son and husband under family; losing teeth under body; flying; secret room under house; dead people; individuation. See also dream as meeting place; dream as spiritual guide; dream as therapist and healer; sex in dreams; ESP in dreams.

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Dream Fairy

Christian Dreams Interpretations available here.

This dictionary of Christian Dreams contains over 13500 indexed entries and this dictionary.

Christian Dream Meaning

Interpretation for Christian Dreams Symbols.

Dream Analysis and Interpretation.

Understand the meaning of your dreams. Great dictionary of dream interpretations.

Christian Dream Symbols

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Because of the ease with which computers can file, son, cross reference and present informa­tion, a great deal of work has been done in analysing the content of thousands of dreams (The Content Analysis oj Dreams, Hall and Van De Castle). As computers are an every­day pan of many homes, we can easily use them to gain insight into our own dreams. Two areas of help are as follows.

We can enter many dreams, then with a program such as Seeker or Masterfile, easily scan through them to see the fre­quency of dream themes. This approach to dreams—self in­sight through a series of dreams—is explained by Hall in The Meaning of Dreams. Important issues in our life and develop­ment occur as frequent dream themes, and are easily seen using a computer.

The program Brainstonn (Brainstorm Software Ltd) makes cross referencing dream symbols and associated comments easy. Using this program, if one dreamt of a tree and wrote one s associations, then six months later dreamt of a tree and entered this, the program instantly reminds you of the past reference to tree and can display it. Gradually a reference base of your own dreams and comments can be built up and quickly scanned. Such comparisons help to form a personality profile of yourself or others.

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My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are able to control the action in your dreams, indicates your growing confidence, high self-esteem and increasing skills. Alternatively, this type of dream may be a way of compensating for a waking situation in which you felt powerless.

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

When people of antiquity had dreams of strange cosmic events, like fire raining down from heaven, comets, etc., they would report them to the Areopagus in Athens or to the Senate in Rome. According to Jung, such dreams meant that the dreamer was being prepared for a position in government.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing.

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Revealing the substance of hope and faith that sustains one’s spirit until fulfillment; see “dreaming”

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

(See Dream interpreter; Moon. Also see Introduction)

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘My husband’s mother, no longer alive, came and slid her arms carefully under me and lifted me up. I shouted “Put me down! Put me down! I don’t want to go yet.” She carefully lowered me on to the bed and disappeared’ (EH). Most dreams in which dead people appear are expressive of our attempts to deal with our feelings, guilt or anger in connection with the person who died, or our own feelings about death. In the example the dreamer is feeling fear about being carried off by death.

When someone close to us dies we go through a period of change from relating to them as an external reality, to meeting and accepting them as alive in our memories and inner life. In the next example the man has not only come to terms with his mother’s and his own death, but also found this inner reality. Example: A dark grey sugar loaf form materialised. This pillar lightened in shade as I watched. It didn’t move. I began to think it was Mrs Molten who died in 1956.

The feeling grew stronger but still the colour lightened. Then it bent over and kissed my head. In that instant I knew it was my mother.

An ecstatic joy and happiness such as I have never known on earth suffused me. That happiness remained constantly in mind for the next few days’ (Mr M).

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

If you should dream of a deceased person and this person speaks only to you, pay close attention to what the spirit is telling you as it could be very important to you.

To dream of seeing a deceased person is normally a dream of warning, and it tells you that the influences around you at this time does not bode well for your affairs, and you should not enter into any binding contracts or verbal agreements until this phase passes.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One hundred and forty dreams were collected from a group of patients suffering depression.

The same number of dreams were collected from people simi­lar in age and social background, but not suffering depression.

The dreams were given code numbers, mixed and given to an independent judge. He was asked to look for any evident themes of self punishment, such as ‘I was waiting for my friends all night but they never turned up’, ‘my fiance married somebody else’. Such self punishing themes were found to occur with greater frequency in the depressives’ dreams.

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About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.

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About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.

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The Fabric of Dream

To dream of relating a dream indicates that something unusual is about to happen (Raphael). Evidently a struggle on the part of the subconscious to bring the matter before the consciousness.

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

It symbolizes the unconscious; awareness is demanded.

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Strangest Dream Explanations

To dream of dreaming is quite common and it represents your subconscious becoming aware of itself. Becoming lucid during your unconscious sleep state is the beginning stages of -mastery as you learn to bridge your conscious mind with your subconscious mind.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion.

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

If you have decided to work systematically with your dreams, it is essential that you begin to keep a dream diary. Just the act of using one will allow you to remember your dreams much more often and more clearly.

What you should keep in mind if you start a dream diary:

1. Make a note about the date of the dream (use the date of the morning following the dream).

2. Start out by describing the events in the dream without any kind of interpretation and in the sequence you remember them.

3. Write whether the dream you remembered is complete or only a fragment.

4. Write how you felt before and after the dream.

5. Give each dream a title at the conclusion, one that best characterizes the content of the dream.

For interpretation, remember the following:

1. The attitude you adopted toward the dream. Were you a passive observer or actively involved in the event?

2. Which persons appeared in the dream and what your attitude is toward them, emotionally and behaviorally.

3. The mood of each individual scene and of the dream in general.

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Dream Fairy

Entries are organized alphabetically, so readers can browse through common subjects or objects in dreams. The material from thousands of dreams gathered during of this essential dream dictionary, alphabetically, providing instant access to a wealth of fascinating prepared of information.
  • Uncover the mysteries of the mind with the help of the most entertaining, colorful, and comprehensive Dream Dictionary ever.
  • Christian Dreams, China interpretation of dreams, India interpretation of dreams andåÊ islamic Dreams entries. Also, Psychological / emotional perspective, Material aspects and Gives gender - specific, interpreted of dream.

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Dream Fairy

Welcome to DreamSymbol.org

We hope that our work will help you to gain insight into the hidden meanings of your dreams.

All e dream interpretations, the meaning of your dream.

On the site there are six different source dream interpretation.

Interprets dreams as a scientific DreamSymbol.org


All e dream interpretations, Dreams contains over 50.000 indexed entries, 32 different sources the meaning of your dream.

This dictionary of Christian Dreams, China interpretation of dreams, India interpretation of dreams contains over 44.500 indexed entries and this dictionary of islamic Dreams contains over 5.500 indexed entries.

Also, Psychological / emotional perspective, Material aspects and Gives gender - specific, interpreted of dream.

Dream Analysis and Interpretation. Understand the meaning of your dreams. Great dictionary of dream interpretations.


Our website is the best dream dictionary and the world’s most advanced wide-ranging interpretation of dreams and dream analysis site. Our online dream dictionary uses plain language that everyone can understand easily. Our dream interpretation dictionary, encyclopedia and contains informations about dream symbols, dream, sleep interpretation of dreams.

Our website is a carefully prepared project that is based on original, unique and reliable sources. We have been adding new sources into our dream dictionary.

Welcome to Our website. We hope you find what you are looking.

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Dream Fairy

Dream Interpretation / Dream Dictionary / Dream Meanings Knowledge is power, so learn to understand the mysteries that are hidden in your dreams. Our dreams contain the messages we need to solve. Dreams come in many shapes and sizes, some vague, some detailed, some frightening, some inspiring. They all contain encoded messages aimed at improving your life. Once we uncover the mysterious symbols and images of our unconscious, we discover the secrets to a happier life. The dream interpretation world has its own language; a visual and symbolic language, filled with obscure clues and hidden meanings. Learn how to accurately decipher your dream experiences, using centuries-old folk wisdom.
Dreams really are, in the truest sense, a doorway: to greater self-awareness, knowledge, success, and the possibility of a rich, full life. Sounds great, but how do you open and walk through that door? You’ll see that there is an actual pathway, with clearly delineated steps, that can take you from wishful thinking about dreams to a reliable dream habit. You’ll find your previously mysterious, invisible inner life can be revealed on a regular basis to assist you in many useful ways. You’ll discover some specific benefits of an active dream life, familiarize yourself with the steps in the dream process, and fine tune your understanding of sleep and dream dynamics. This way, you can build motivation and enthusiasm, be aligned with the natural flow of dreams, and get out of your own way by becoming aware of what inhibits dreaming.
Symbols are the language of dreams, an intuitive shortcut your soul uses to talk to you. They convey a vast amount of encoded information that always pertains to your own process of living and evolving. Every symbol is somehow about you. In a typical dream scene composed of a group of symbols you can find clues to how you’re developing, what you want to create, how you need to heal, or how to make correct choices.
To truly understand what a symbol represents, you must feel into or merge into the symbol, pretend to be the thing, and speak from its point of view about what it knows. This way, you enter the direct experience of what it is to be a daisy, a polar bear, a set of lost keys, or a school bus. And the symbol comes alive. Once you become the symbol, it’s easier to see how the image is a part of you and your life process.
They have become the “interpreters supreme” when it comes to dreams.
It seems that most people remember their dreams. Not all, certainly, but the majority And, whether we realize it or not, dreams have a profound influence on our well-being. Scientists have proven that dreams are necessary; without them we would probably go insane! By examining our dreams, we are able to establish physical and mental needs to bring balance to our lives.
Modern science says that we spend between 25 percent and 50 percent of our sleeping time in the dream state. We have an average of six dream periods every night and each dream lasts anywhere up to forty minutes. Apparently if we didn’t have these dreams we would go crazy Most of them are from our unconscious mind, trying to get a message across to us for our own well-being. Who is to say they are wrong? That may be exactly what our unconscious mind is—proddings from the spirits.

The point is that if we are being given these messages for our own well-being, it would behoove us to try to understand them, to listen to the spirits.

The uncon¬scious, or the spirits, employ symbols with which we are familiar. They present the message using objects that per¬tain to our everyday life, the better that we may under¬stand what is being communicated. Sigmund Freud believed that the unconscious mind contains repressed material—wishes, thoughts, experi-ences—that the individual will not accept into the con¬scious mind. These things are therefore repressed and often disguised. Carl Jung called this repressed material the “Personal Unconscious.” He believed that there was also the “Collective Unconscious,” which contained elements from racial memories and experiences. Discover how to:

  • Recognize your dream cycles, Increase your ability to remember your dreams, Keep and use a dream diary, Notice your waking dreams, Uncover hidden messages in your dreams, Focus your dreams to solve problems or make decisions, Form a dream support group.

Dream Interpretation & an A to Z dictionary of symbols and their meanings helps you make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase your creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance.

A to Z Dream Dictionary and Dream Interpretation will help you become an expert dream interpreter.

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Dream Fairy

Dream Dictionary - Welcome to DreamSymbol.org

DreamSymbol on Dream, changes your perspective.

DreamSymbol.org is the world’s largest online dream interpretation site with 32 different sources, from the scientifically and also that it as cultural and religious.

Prepared using benefiting different sources, Dream Dictionary contains over 50.000 dream symbols to help you uncover the messages in your dreams.

Dream Meaning

DreamSymbol.org, you find out how to make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance. Even if you just read the dictionary definitions, you can begin to understand symbology in a much deeper way.

Dreams teach us so much about what’s possible in life. We want your inner dream life to help expand your idea of how big you are, how much knowledge you have to draw from, how much you can accomplish, and how interconnected you are with everything and everyone.

DreamSymbol.org is designed to help you synchronize your body, emotions, mind, and soul so that you can experience the divine sanity that underlies your life’s unfolding.

Each word has been defined on three levels (physical, emotional, and mental-spiritual) so that you can be precise and holistic when interpreting your dreams. Sometimes symbols pertain to all the levels at once.

The meanings listed in this “DreamSymbol” are accurate, useful, and modern.

”DreamSymbol” is a powerful tool containing countless insights into the meaning of your inner and outer life.

To begin the journey of discovering these secrets, start with your most immediate interest. No matter where you enter this “DreamSymbol, you’ll find something that pertains to your life and leads to the next curiosity.

Dream interpretation search engine

What are your dreams trying to tell you?

Dreams are the most honest friend you’ll ever have – they’ll tell you you’ve

just made the worst decision of your life or that you are handling a problem

really badly.

  • What kinds of dreams do you have?
  • Are they mundane, everyday dreams?
  • Or are they fantastical?
  • Do you have simple, short dreams, or are they long and rambling?
  • Do they have a logical progression – or do they spastically leap from place to place without any transitions?

Whichever you experience – that was what was happening in your mind!

Many people believe you should listen to what your dreams are trying to tell

you as they all have meanings.

Find the True Hidden meaning behind your dreams.

Write search in box to find the meaning of the dream. You will find the interpretation of the dream you see absolutely.


All Dream Symbols and Dream Meanings

The world’s greatest and most beautiful dream interpretation site “dreamsymbol.org”

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Dreamers Dictionary

Symbols, metaphors, and archetypes in your dream do not appear by accident but usually have a deeper and more powerful significance. Some dreams are simply a way for us to MdigestH the previous day’s events. Most of the time, however, they are messages from our soul, unresolved events and feelings that still reside in our unconscious; they also may provide “visionary” suggestions. That is the reason why we believe it is so important to try to decipher dreams.

The best “specialist” to do this is you.

An expert dream analyst or a psychotherapist would at best be a “midwife” or guide, and then only if your dream presented clear indications that there was emotional illness and that psychological support was important.

A dream symbol often points to several possibilities.

For instance, the question of whether you are the victim or the perpetrator plays a major role that only honest self-examination can answer. Dream interpretation is not a game, some thing you do every now and then. It only makes sense if it becomes—like daily hygiene—a consistent part of your daily routine—a form of “emotional hygiene.” The rewards are well worth the effort. Nothing can replace self-analysis followed by self-awareness. Only in this way can you lead a happy and productive life and be at peace with yourself.

Your unconscious is often the best friend you can have, because it provides advice and suggestions about how to deal with the problems that arise.

The wisdom of your unconscious can even open a window into the future—allowing you to face the unknown with confidence.

The increase in the number of people who suffer from emotional problems can be laid at the door of today’s culture, with its emphasis on acquiring money, property, and success. But those who are in touch with their unconscious and its messages won’t easily violate the natural needs of their soul.

The best protection we have against depression, anxieties, and coundess other emotional problems is effective dream interpretation.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

In a dream, a dream interpreter represents happiness for a sad person and sorrow for a happy person.

If one who desires to maintain secrecy around his life and goals sees a dream interpreter in his dream, it means that he will find an intimate friend or a confidant to complete his intention.

If one is expecting news from an associate or if someone in a different land sees a dream interpreter in his dream, it means that he will receive the desired news.Adream interpreter in a dream also represents knowledge of sings, deciphering messages, analyzing substances, a tracer, a religious scholar, a lawyer, a good advisor, a compassionate friend, ajudge or a physician.

A dream interpreter in a dream also represents someone who does not keep a secret or someone who brings people both happy or sad news. In a dream, he is also a preacher, an advisor, one who balances things, a money changer, a garment cleaner, an undertaker, a barber, a comedian, a news broadcaster or someone who searches for people’s faults. Seeing oneself as a dream interpreter in a dream, and if one qualifies to sit on the bench, it means that he will become ajudge.lfhe is seeking knowledge, he will acquire it.

If he is seeking to become a physician, he will become one. Otherwise, he might become a money changer, a banker or any of the earlier mentioned trades. Telling a dream interpreted a dream in one’s dream, and if the explanation agrees with the common wisdom and religious norms of the Holy Qur’an and the traditions of God’s Prophet, upon whom be peace, then whatever one is told in his dream is true. Ifone does not understand the explanation of the dream interpreter in his dream, then he might need to find a qualified interpreter in wakefulness to satisfy his needs. (Also see Astrologer; Divination; Fortuneteller; Founder; Interpretation; Seer)

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Dream Fairy

The now classic dream meaning, newly revised and updated for the new millenium!

The Ultimate Illustrated Encyclopedia of Signs, Symbols & Dream Interpretation


  • Helps to unlock the secret language of your personal dream world.
  • With all new material, including dream meaning, new categories, and new links, the Dream Dictionary is bigger and better than ever before.
  • See what is happening, in your mind, and in your most guarded self and intuitions...
  • Discover what your style of dreaming (color, smell, setting, and other key elements) says about you. It’s all here, and more, in the ultimate meaning to your world of dreams!

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Below are described simple techniques which make it possible to gain information quickly from dreams. They have been put as a series of questions.

What is the background to the dream? The most imponant aspects of your everyday life may have influenced the dream or feature in it. Briefly consider any aspects of your life which connect with what appears in the dream. Example: ‘1 have a plane to catch. I get to the plane but the suitcase is never big enough for my clothing which I have left behind. I am always anxious about stuff left behind. I wake still with the feeling of anxiety’ (Jane). When asked, Jane said plane flights had been a big feature of her life. She had moved home often, travelling to different pans of the world, leaving friends and loved ones behind.

What is the main action in the dream? There is often an over­all activity such as walking, looking, worrying, building some­thing, or trying to escape. Define what it is and consider if it is expressive of something you are doing in waking life. Activi­ties such as walking or building a house need to be seen as generalisations; walking can simply represent taking a direc­tion in life. When you have defined the action, look for fur­ther information under the other headings in this book, such as swimming or sitting.

What is your role in the dream? Are you a friend, lover, sol­dier, dictator, watcher or participant in the dream? Consider this in relationship with your everyday life, especially in con­nection with how the dream presents it. Where possible, look for the entry on the role in this book. See dreamer.

Are you active or passive in the dream? By passive is meant not taking the leading role, being only an observer, being directed by other people and events, If you are passive, consider if you live in a similar attitude in your life. See active/passive.

What do you feel in the dream? Define what is felt emotionally and physically. In the physical sense are you tired, cold, re­laxed or hungry? In the emotional sense do you feel sad, angry, lost, tender or frightened anywhere in the dream? This helps clarify what feeling area the dream is dealing with. It is important also to define whether the feelings in the dream were satisfyingly expressed or whether held back.

If held back they need fuller expression. See emotions and mood.

Is there a because’ factor in the dream? In many dreams something happens, fails to happen, or appears . . . be­cause! For instance, trapped in a room you find a door to escape through. All is dark beyond and you do not go through the door ‘because’ you are frightened of the dark. In this case the ‘because’ factor is fear.

The dream also suggests you are trapped in an unsatisfying life through fear of opportunity or the unknown.

Am I meeting the things I fear in my dream? Because a dream is an entirely inward thing, we create it completely out of our own internal feelings, images, creativity, habits and insights. So even the monsters of our dream are a pan of ourself.

If we run from them it is only aspects of ourself we are avoiding. Through defining what feelings occur in the dream you may be able to clarify what it is you are avoiding. See nightmares; dream as spiritual guide.

What does the dream mean? We alone create the dream while asleep. Therefore, by looking at each symbol or aspect of the dream, we can discover from what feelings, thoughts or expe­rience, what drive or what insight we have created the drama of the dream. In a playful relaxed way, express whatever you think, feel, remember or fantasise when you hold each symbol in mind. Say or write it all, even the seemingly trivial or dan­gerous’ bits. It helps to act the pan of each thing if you can; for instance as a house you might describe yourself as ‘a bit old, but with open doors for family and friends to come in and out. I feel solid and dependable, but I sense there is something hidden in my cellar’. Such statements portray one­self graphically. Consider whatever information you gather as descriptive of your waking life. Try to summarise it, as this will aid the gaining of insight.

Try amplifying your dream You will need the help of one or two friends to use this method.

The basis is to take the role of each part of the dream, as described above. This may seem strange at first, but persist. Supposing your name is Julia and you dreamt you were carrying an umbrella, but failed to use it even though it was raining, you would talk in the first person present—I am an umbrella. Julia is carrying me but for some reason doesn’t use me.’ Having finished saying what you could about yourself, your friend(s) then ask you questions about yourself as the dream figure or object. These questions need to be simple and directly about the dream symbol. So they could ask Are you an old umbrella?’ Does Julia know she is canying you?’ ‘What is your function as an umbrella? ‘Are you big enough to shelter Julia and someone else?’ And so on.

The aim of the questions is to draw out information about the symbol being explored.

If it is a known person or object you are in the role of—your father for instance—the replies to the questions need to be answered from the point of view of what happened in the dream, rather than as in real life. Listen to what you are saying about yourself as the dream symbol, and when your questioneKs) has finished, review your statements to see if you can see how they refer to your life and yourself.

If you are asking the questions, even if you have ideas regarding the dream, do not attempt to interpret. Put your ideas into simple questions the dreamer can respond to. Maintain a sense of curiosity and attempt to understand, to make the dream plain in an everyday language sense. Lead the dreamer towards seeing what the dream means through the questions. When you have exhausted your questions ask the dreamer to summarise what they have gathered from their replies. See postures, movements and body language for an example of how to work with body movement to explore a dream meaning.

Can / alter the dream to find greater satisfaction? Imagine yourself in the dream and continue it as a fantasy or day­dream. Alter the dream in any way that satisfies. Experiment with it, play with it, until you find a fuller sense of self expres­sion. It is very imponant to note whether any anger or hostil­ity is in the dream but not fully expressed.

If so, let yourself imagine a full expression of the anger. It may be that as this is practised more anger is openly expressed in subsequent dreams. This is healthy, allowing such feelings to be vented and redirected into satisfying ways, individually and socially. In doing this do not ignore any feelings of resistance, pleasure or anxiety. Satisfaction occurs only as we leam to acknowl­edge and integrate resistances and anxieties into what we ex­press. This is a very important step. It gradually changes those of our habits which trap us in lack of satisfaction, poor cre­ativity or inability to resolve problems.

Summary To summarise effectively gather the essence of what you have said about each symbol and the dream as a whole and express it in everyday language. Imagine you are explaining to someone who knows nothing about yourself or the dream. Bnng the dream out of its symbols into everyday comments about yourself.

A man dreamt about a grey, dull office. When he looked at what he said about the office he realised he was talking about the grey, unimaginative world he grew up in after the Second World War, and how it shaped him.

Further information on using these techniques can be found in Tony Crisp s work The Instant Dream Book, published by C.W. Daniel. See amplification; plot of dream; adventure of the dream world; dreamer; postures, movement and body language; settings; symbols and dreaming; word analysis of dreams; wordplay and puns.

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Dream Fairy

All e dream interpretations, Dreams contains over 50.000 indexed entries, 32 different sources the meaning of your dream.

This dictionary of Christian Dreams, China interpretation of dreams, India interpretation of dreams contains over 44.500 indexed entries and this dictionary of islamic Dreams contains over 5.500 indexed entries.

Also, Psychological / emotional perspective, Material aspects and Gives gender - specific, interpreted of Dream Analysis and Interpretation.

Understand the meaning of your dreams. Great dictionary of dream interpretations.

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Dream Fairy

Dream Interpretation & an A to Z dictionary of symbols and their meanings helps you make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase your creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance. A to Z Dream Dictionary and Dream Interpretation will help you become an expert dream interpreter.
Dream symbolism communicates more accurately than a thousand words when the dreamer understands what the chosen dream symbols mean. One symbol can represent different ideas, concepts and things to every individual. Their divine secrets will release your concealed potential so that you can design the destiny you have always longed for. With in-depth, classic meanings and an empowering technique for personalized interpretation, our site is the most complete and balanced guide to understanding your dreams. As omens or insights, as alarms or a memory, for years people have been interpreting their dreams in different way, with whatever comforts them, but now we have science. Researchers have spent time in comprehending, studying, understanding them, for all dreams don’t really say the same story. It becomes fascinating and complicated when people from diff a rent cultural background, societies, past, present, living standards, problems, mental illness report same dreams. Features an alphabetized list of over 42.000 dream symbols and meaning with classic. This dictionary of Christian Dreams, China interpretation of dreams, India interpretation of dreams contains over 24700 indexed entries and this dictionary of islamic Dreams contains over 5300 indexed entries. Also, Psychological / emotional perspective, Material aspects and Gives gender – specific, interpret of dream. Dreamfairy.org the complete dream dictionary is the only interpretation site based on concrete data about real people's dreams and how the real events in their lives relate to their nighttime visions.
  • You will be able to interpret the hidden messages revealed to you in your sleep.
  • See how to use dreams to solve problems and explore past lives and look into the future.
  • Extraordinary color illustrations conjure up the mystical images of your dreams.
  • A dream that takes place on an island may indicate a need for personal space.
  • A dream of rabbits running in green grass is a good omen.
  • A ship in dock or on a calm sea may promise happiness in love. By deciphering the language of your dreams, you can achieve greater spiritual awareness and lasting happiness.

Understand the meaning of dreams. Great dictionary of dream interpretation. Dreams Interpreted, the most compelling and thorough study of all the symbols that appear in our dreams. By reading the dictionary definitions, you'll be gin to understand symbology in a much deeper way. You’ll learn how to synchronize your body, emotions, mind, and soul to experience the full meaning of your dreams and, in some cases, make them your reality.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A dream presents us with emotions or information we may be avoiding while awake. Usually a dream within a dream is a ploy one uses to explain away the impact of the feelings met—which is all the more reason to understand the dream.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our current ‘self image’ is displayed by what we do in our dreams.

If we are the active and central character in our dreams, then we have a positive, confident image of our­self.

The role we place ourself in is also the one we feel at home with, or one which is habitual to us.

If we are con­stantly a victim in our dreams, we need to consider whether we are living such a role in everyday life. Dreams may help us look at our self image from a more detached viewpoint. We can look back on what we do in a dream more easily than we can on our everyday waking behaviour. This helps us under­stand our attitudes or stance, a very growth-promoting experi­ence. It is important to understand the viewpoint of the other dream characters also; although they depict secondary views, they enlarge us through acquaintance. See identity and dreams.

What we ourself are doing in our dreams is an expression of how we see ourselves at the time of the dream, our stance or attitude to life, or what could be generalised as our self image. It typifies what aspects of our nature we identify with most strongly.

Example: My husband and I are at some sort of social club.

The people there are ex-workmates of mine and I am having a wonderful time and am very popular. My husband is enjoying my enjoyment’ (quoted from article by the author in She magazine).

The dreamer describes herself as ‘a mature 41- year old’.

The dream, and her description of it, sum up her image of herself in just a few words. She sees herself as attrac­tive, sociable, liked, happily married. She is probably good looking and healthy. But the dream carries on. She and her husband ‘are travelling down a country lane in an open horse drawn carriage. It is very dark and is in the areas we used to live. We come to a hump-backed bridge, and as we amve at the brow of the bridge a voice says, “Fair lady, come to me.” My body is suddenly lying flat and starts to rise. I float and everything is black, warm and peaceful. Then great fear comes over me and I cry out my husband’s name over and over. I get colder and slip in and out of the blackness. I wake. Even with the light on I feel the presence of great evil. From a very positive sense of self, she has moved to a feeling which horri­fies her. How can such a confident, socially capable woman, one who has succeeded professionally as well as in her mar­riage, have such feelings? The answer probably lies in the statement of her age. At 41 she is facing the menopause and great physical change.

The image of herself she has lived with depended, or developed out of, having a firm sexually attrac­tive body, and being capable of having children. Losing what­ever it is that makes one sexually desirable must change the image others have of one, and that one has of oneself.

The hump of the bridge represents this peak of her life, from whence she will start to go downhill towards death, certainly towards retirement. So she is facing midlife crisis in which a new image of herself will need to be forged.

To define what self image is portrayed in your dreams, consider just what situation you have created for yourself in the dream, and what environment and people you are with. Example: I am a shy 16 year old and am worried about my dream. In it I am walking along the school’s main corridor. I try to cover myself with my hands as a few pei pie go by, not noticing me. Then a group of boys pass, pointing and laugh­ing at me—one boy I used to fancy.

A teacher then gives me clothes. They are too big but I wear them because I have nothing else’ (HM). Adolescence is a time of great change anyway, when a lot is developing as far as self image is con­cerned. Her nakedness shows how vulnerable she feels, and how she has a fear that other people must be able to see her developing sexuality and womanhood. It is new to her and still embarrassing, particularly with boys she feels something for. She tries to cover up her feelings, and uses attitudes she has learnt from parents and teachers, but these are not suit­able. So we might summarise by saying that the situation she places herself in within the dream shows her present uncer­tainty and sense of needing clothes—attitudes or confidence —of her own. See identity in dreams; individuation.

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Dreaming in a dream is of significant importance; research details

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New American Dream Dictionary

1. Difficulty in taking emotions seriously.

2. Urge to con­trol the unconscious mind (as in “setting the stage” where the dreamer creates the dream).

3. Express a desire to obtain seem­ingly impossible things.

4. Worries and sorrow.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

one is paralysed is similar. It depicts the paralys­ing effects, either of fears we have or of what we have imag­ined as real in the way described, we may be ‘paralysed’ by feelings of guilt or inadequacy; internal conflict paralyses us.

The healing of the paralysed man by Christ represents this removal of guilt, shame or fear by contact with the self.

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The Language of Dreams

A type of lucid experience or an OBE. (See Part One: Programmed and Lucid Dreaming).

A memory. Dreaming that you’re dreaming can be an alternative way of recalling images from past dreams. Watch, and let this vision play itself out like a good movie, then recall the details like any ordinary dream.

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Mystic Dream Book

To dream that you consult anyone about your dreams shows that you may expect news from a distance.

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My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are dreaming, signifies your anxious emotional state. You are quite worried and fearful about a situation that you are going through currently.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Generally speaking, arms, firearms, ammunition and all other weapons-primitive or modern-symbolise power, strength, honour, superiority, vicotyr and grandeur for the persons who sees them in his dream.. He will acquire these according to his intellect and popularity. Any modifications and improvements in them denote added honour, power and strength.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

To see someone speaking to the observer or giving him something suggests that the observer4 will socialize or deal with him or someone who bears a similar name or resembles him.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Vessels symbolise servants and lads while stove, hearths, grates, cauldrons, lamps, table-cloths etc. symbolise grief, sorrow and anxiety which will be felt by the head of the household if the Arabic masculine equivalent is used for any of the above words. But it it is used as a feminine such as qidr, qifah, maa’idah, musarrajah and qas’ah, then they symbolise a person’s wife.. As for the word sufrah though feminine, it symbolises the husband all the same.

(Qidr : Cauldron, Cooking Pot; Qifah : large basket; Maa’idah : table-cloth; Musrrajah : lamp; Qas’ah trough)

Whatever is made from copper or lead such as cups, saucers, plates, trays kettles etc. they all symbolise a person’s servants and lads.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Just before his title fight in 1947, Sugar Ray Robinson dreamt he was in the ring with Doyle. ‘I hit him a few good punches and he was on his back, his blank eyes staring up at me.’ Doyle never moved and the crowd were shouting ‘He’s dead! He’s dead!’ He was so upset by the dream Robinson asked Adkins, his trainer and promoter, to call off the fight. Adkins told him ‘Dreams don’t come true.

If they did I’d be a millionaire.* In the eighth round Doyle went down from a left hook to the jaw. He never got up, and died the next day.

The problem is that many such dreams felt to be predictive never come true. Often dreamers want to believe they have precognitive dreams, perhaps to feel they will not be surprised by, and thereby anxious about, the future. When the baby son of Charles Lindbergh was kidnapped, and before it was known he was murdered, 1,300 people sent ‘precognitive’ dreams concerning his fate in response to newspaper head­lines. Only seven of these dreams included the three vital factors—that he was dead, naked and in a ditch.

Out of 8,000 dreams in his Registry for Prophetic Dreams,

Robert Nelson, who was sent dreams pnor to what was pre­dicted, has found only 48 which bear detailed and recognis­able connection with later events.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example:41 dreamt my sister was attacking me with a pair of scissors. She backed me against a wall and stabbed me. During the day after the dream my sister phoned me at work and said she’d had an awful dream in which she stabbed me with scissors’ (D).

The Poseidia Institute of Vir­ginia Beach, Va., have run a number of group ‘mutual dream­ing’ experiments. Although the Institute suggests very positive results, a critical survey of the dreams and reports reveals a lack of hard evidence. Like other areas of ESP dreaming, it can seldom ever be willed. But the dreams did show themes related to problems regarding intimate meeting. Also, some of the dreams were directly about the goal of dream meeting, as in the following example.

Example: ‘I find the group of people I am looking for. There were maybe six or more people. They were asleep on mattresses except for two or three. These were awake and waiting for me, and wearing small pointed hats such as Ti­betan Lamas wear. In the dream I realised this meant they had achieved sufficient inner growth to remain awake in sleep. We started to communicate and were going to wake the others’ (Tom C). See dream as a meeting place.

the dream as extended perception Even everyday mental func­tions such as thought and memory occur largely uncon­sciously. During sleep, perhaps because we surrender our vo­lition, what is left of self awareness enters the realm where the nine-tenths of the iceberg of our mind is active. In this realm faculties can function which on waking seem unobtainable.

For example:

1- Extending awareness to a point distant from the body, to witness events confirmed by other people. This is often called out of body experience (OBE), but some of these experiences suggest the nature of consciousness and time may not be dualistic (having to be either here or there). See out of body experience.

2-Being aware of the death or danger of a member of family. Kinship and love seem to be major factors in the way the unconscious functions. See dead people dreams.

3-Seeing into the workings of the body and diagnosing an illness before it becomes apparent to waking observation. Dr Vasali Kasatkin and Professor Medard Boss have specialised in the study of such dreams. In a recent dream told to me, a man looked back into a bedroom and saw a piece of the wall fall away. Waves of water gushed from a main pipe.

The dreamer struggled to hold back the piece of broken pipe. Within two weeks his colon burst and he had to have a major operation. See meditation.

4-Access to a computer-like ability to son through a massive store of information and experience to solve problems. These dreams are often confused with precognitive ability. Prediction does occur from these dreams, but it arises, as with weather prediction, from a massive gathering of in­formation, most of which we have forgotten consciously. Monon Schatzman, in a New Scientist anicle, showed how subjects can produce answers to complex mathematical problems in their dreams. See dream process as com­puter; creativity and problem solving in dreams.

5-Tapping a collective mind which stores all experience, and is sensed as godlike or holy. See dream as spiritual guide.

It seems likely that before the development of speech the human animal communicated largely through body lan­guage. Some dreams suggest we still have this ability to read a person’s health, sexual situation, intentions and even their past, through body shape, posture and tiny movements. See postures, movement and body language.

See Cayce, Edgar; collective unconscious; wife under family. See also hallucinations.

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are dreaming is usually the effect of excessive worry and in one dream the dreamer wakes up to find that things are all straightened out until, lo and behold, the sleeper finds it is yet another dream. It is not uncommon to have more than two levels to a dream, the main reason hear is fear and worry over life’s circumstances. There is no interpretation for this dream as it is not a symbol, it is condition of the state of the emotions of the dreamer.

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

To dream that you are dreaming is usually the effect of excessive worry and in one dream the dreamer wakes up to find that things are all straightened out until, lo and behold, the sleeper finds it is yet another dream. It is not uncommon to have more then two levels to a dream, the main reason hear is fear, and worry, over life’s circumstances. There is no interpretation for this dream as it is not a symbol, it is condition of the state of the emotions of the dreamer.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Greece Antiphon, a Greek living in the fourth century bc. wrote the first known descriptive book of dreams. It was designed to be used for practical and profes­sional interpretations. He maintained that dreams are not cre­ated by supernatural powers but natural conditions. In the second century ad a similar book was written by Anemidorus, a Greek physician who lived in Rome. He claimed to have gathered his infonnation from ancient sources, possibly from the Egyptian dream book dating from the second millennium bc. He may have used works from the Assurbanipal library, later destroyed, which held one of the most complete collec­tions of dream literature. Anemidorus classified dreams into dreams, visions, oracles, fantasies and apparitions. He identi­fied two classes of dreams: the somnium, which forecast events; and the insomnium, which are concerned with present matters.

For the somnium dreams Anemidorus gave a dream dictionary.

For example, he said abyss meant an impending danger, a dream of warning, and to see a candle being lighted forecasts a binh, to exhibit a lighted candle augers content­ment and prosperity, a dimly burning candle shows sickness, sadness and delay. This last interpretation is taken from folk­lore of the times and, because dreams tend to use commonly used verbal images, was probably true. He maintained that a person’s name—that is their identity, and the family, national and social background from which they arose—has a bearing on what their dream means.

Plato (429-347 bc) said that even good men dream of un­controlled and violent actions, including sexual aggression. These actions are not committed by good men while awake, but criminals act them out without guilt. Democritus said that dreams are not products of an ethereal soul, but of visual impressions which influence our imagination. Aristotle (383— 322 bc) stated that dreams can predict future events. Earlier Hippocrates, the ‘father of medicine’, discovered that dreams can reveal the onset of organic illness. Such dreams, he said, can be seen as illogically representing external reality.

Hippocrates was born on the island of Kos. On the island was the famous temple dedicated to Aesculapius, the god of medicine. There were about 300 such temples in Greece alone, dedicated to healing through the use of dreams. Hip­pocrates was an Aesculapian, and learnt his form of dream interpretation from them. In such temples the patient would ritually have to cleanse themselves by washing, and abstain from sex, alcohol and even food. They would then be led into what was sometimes a subterranean room with harmless snakes in—these were the symbol of the god. In the morning the patients were asked their dream, and it was expected they would dream an answer to their illness or problem. There are many attestations to the efficacy of this technique from pa­tients.

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Strangest Dream Explanations

To dream of Steven Spielberg or of his motion picture production company is about opening your creativity to the skies and beyond. You are beginning an out of the box creative exploration, realizing that your fantasy life could translate into a profitable career.

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Dream Fairy

  • He should show sincerity and submission to Allah to guide him to the correct interpretation.
  • He should listen carefully to the dream and understand all its details.
  • He should inquire about the dreamer’s background, and should have the wisdom and ability to distinguish between people’s status and condition so as to modify the interpretation accordingly.
  • He should deal only with dreams that have an apparent value as glad tidings, warnings, or guidance; and should avoid dealing with other dreams that appear to be mixed-up medleys.
  • He should realize the seriousness of dream interpretation, and that it is at the level of giving fatwa in matters of religion.
  • He should not rush to interpret a dream before having the chance to fully understand it and ponder over its possibilities.
  • He should have no hesitation to admit his limited knowledge and inability to interpret dreams that perplex him.
  • He should use the dream as a chance to advise the dreamer.
  • He should give the interpretation that he believes to be true, without trying to give a good interpretation for a bad dream.
  • He may withhold the interpretation of harmful dreams.
  • He should guard the dreamer’s secrets.
  • He should suppress any conceit about his skill — remembering that any correct interpretation is only by Allah’s guidance and favor.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

It is imperative that the mu’abbir or interpreter understands fully and properly every details of a dream seen by any person. He should be able to weigh it on the scale of the rules of interpretation.

If the numerous facts emerging from a dream are such that they correspond with each other logically then such a dream will be deemed as a genuine and authentic dream. But if the facts emerging from such a dream are such that they do not correspond with each other then the interpreter should reflect on the apparent meaning of the words. Whichever meaning is nearest to the rules of interpretation, such a meaning should be adopted

If a dream is of a complicated nature so that if cannot be weighed on the scale of the rules of interpretation then such a dream will be deemed as meaningless.

If a certain dream causes the interpreter to become dubious then he should appeal to the conscience of the observer of such a dream: If the dream concerns Salaah, he should question him about Sallah; if it concerns a journey he should question him about the journey; if it concerns marriage, he should question him about marriage. Thereafter, the mu’abbir will interpret to the best of his knowledge

The interpreter should be extremely cautious when interpreting a dream: If the dream evidences obscenity and indecency he should either use pleasant words when interpreting it or simply avoid interpreting it.

It is necessary for a mu’abbir to establish the biological and logical classification of thins and give its interpretation accordingly.

The biological and logical classification of things can be made as follows : (a) geneses (b) species (c) nature and characteristics.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

It is imperative that the mu’abbir or interpreter understands fully and properly every details of a dream seen by any person. He should be able to weigh it on the scale of the rules of interpretation.

If the numerous facts emerging from a dream are such that they correspond with each other logically then such a dream will be deemed as a genuine and authentic dream. But if the facts emerging from such a dream are such that they do not correspond with each other then the interpreter should reflect on the apparent meaning of the words. Whichever meaning is nearest to the rules of interpretation, such a meaning should be adopted

If a dream is of a complicated nature so that if cannot be weighed on the scale of the rules of interpretation then such a dream will be deemed as meaningless.

If a certain dream causes the interpreter to become dubious then he should appeal to the conscience of the observer of such a dream: If the dream concerns Salaah, he should question him about Sallah; if it concerns a journey he should question him about the journey; if it concerns marriage, he should question him about marriage. Thereafter, the mu’abbir will interpret to the best of his knowledge

The interpreter should be extremely cautious when interpreting a dream: If the dream evidences obscenity and indecency he should either use pleasant words when interpreting it or simply avoid interpreting it.

It is necessary for a mu’abbir to establish the biological and logical classification of thins and give its interpretation accordingly.

The biological and logical classification of things can be made as follows : (a) geneses (b) species (c) nature and characteristics.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

See science, sleep and dreams, fortress See house, buildings.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Over the years many theories to ex­plain the ‘why’ of dreams have been put forward. These range from dreams being messages from spirits; being results of food eaten prior to sleep; the mind freewheeling nonsensi­cally; the garbage disposal system of the mind; suggestions from waking experience; a computer reprogramming for the brain; to Freud’s wish fulfilment and Jung’s compensation theory.

If we do not argue any particular theory, however, then perhaps we see dreams as having a much wider function.

The most primal drives observable are survival, growth and repro­duction. Other urges, such as eating, social position, curiosity, are secondary.

The human animal appears to have survived and reproduced more capably after the development of self awareness, language and reasoning. With or without these, we remain an animal with a psychobiological nature. All ani­mals are known to dream. All animals share a certain situa­tion. They have an internal world out of which arises im­pulses (to eat, to mate, to avoid danger) and feeling reactions (anger, fear, anticipation). And they have an external world which confronts them with real survival dangers, sources of food, a mate, changes in environmental conditions.

A dream lies somewhere between these two worlds.

We can think of the human personality as being like a special son of cavity into which all these influences are dropped or are thrown. Physical sensations, internal drives and emotions, language, social rules, religious ideas; prompts to make decisions; news of war, massive media and advertis­ing information, are all dropped in.

The cavity has to deal with it, but as it is a mixture of things, many of which are in opposition, some sort of balance has to be kept. But how? And it cannot be simply a matter of throwing out all of one sort or aspect of things. Eradicating the memory of criticism might make us more calm, but it would limit the process of psychological growth, which has survival value.

Dreams can be seen to be connected with our survival and self regulating process. Because this involves all aspects of oneself and one’s experience, one cannot give dreams a single definition. They probably have many secondary functions, such as an interface to balance the internal and external influ­ences, to compensate between the inner needs and outer real­ity—a baby may miss its feed so, to cope with this primal need, it may dream of being fed. Traumatic or exterior danger­ous events, which cannot be processed immediately, can be stored and dealt with (experimented with or abreacted) while asleep. In higher mammals, infant traumas can be stored and dealt with in sleep when, or if, a stronger ego develops.

To meet the loneliness and isolation of consciousness’ or fears of death, the dream can link the waking self with its unconscious sense of unity or God.

To meet survival needs of primitive human beings prior to rational thought, the dream probably acted as a computer, synthesising experience and information, giving rise to creative solutions to hunting or social situations, presented as sleeping or waking imagery. This may explain why many pnmitive people say skills such as farming, weav­ing, writing, were told them by a vision of a god or goddess.

If we realise that the dream is an end product of a process which produces it, it enables us to see that the process’ (the survival function which regulates, compensates, links, prob­lem solves) can be accessed without meeting the dream. See sleep movements; dream process as computer; Adler; Freud; Jung.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

When two separate things with opposing interpretations are seen in a dream then the stronger or better of the two interpretations will be given. As an example is a person sees a bathroom and himself as removing hair using a lotion or lime-whereas a bathroom represents grief and sorrow and removing hair using a lotion or lime represents the removing of grief and sorrow- it means that his grief and sorrow will be removed, for the dream of removing hair using lime or lotion is regarded as stronger or better.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many experiments have been done using hypnosis in connection with dreams. In the early pan of this century Carl Schroetter hypnotised Miss E, a pharmacist, in an attempt to test Freud’s theory of symbol formation. He suggested Miss E would dream of having homosexual inter­course with a female friend, L.

The dream she subsequently reported was ‘1 sit in a small dirty cafe holding a tremendous French newspaper ...

A woman with a strong Yiddish ac­cent—L is Jewish—asks me twice, “Don’t you need any­thing?” I don’t answer . . . she comes a third time . . . I recognise her as my acquaintance. She holds a threadbare suitcase with a sticker on it that reads “For ladies only!” I leave the cafe with her . . . she hangs onto me which I find unpleasant but suffer it . . . Before her house she pulls out an enormous bunch of keys and gives one to me. “1 trust only you with it; it is the key to this case. You might like to use it. Just watch that my husband doesn’t get hold of it.” ‘ The dream contains several of the classical Freudian symbols of sex, such as the suitcase, the key and the phrase For ladies only’. Miss E had not, according to Schroetter, heard or read of Freud’s ideas.

Roffenstein, suspecting Miss E may have known something of Freudian ideas, chose ‘a 28-year-old, totally uneducated nursemaid of lower than average intelligence, who grew up and still lives in an uneducated milieu’. He suggested she dream of intercourse with her father. She reported: ‘I dreamt about my father, as if he had presented me with a great bag and with it he gave me a large key. It was a very large key. It looked like the key to a house. I had a sad feeling. I opened the bag. I snake jumped out against my mouth; I shrieked aloud.

More recent expenments are reponed by Woods and Greenhouse in New Wbrld of Dreams.

The suggestion was made to one subject that as a child she had wet the bed and her mother scolded her. That night she dreamt she fell into a pond in winter and her mother was angry.

An interesting aspect of these experiments is that another subject under hyp­nosis was told the dream and asked what it meant. Without hesitation she said. Oh, that girl must have wet the bed.’ This and other experiments suggest humans have an inherent, al­though perhaps unconscious, ability to understand the lan­guage of dreams.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

To have a sense of personal existence distinct from others may be unique to human beings, and in large measure due to the learning of language. Jung and Neumann’s studies of the historical development of identity suggest, in an evolutionary sense, that having an T is still a very newly acquired function. This makes it vulnerable. It is also noticeably something which develops during childhood and reaches different levels of maturity during adulthood. Al­though it is our central experience, it remains an enigma—a will o’ the wisp, which loses itself in dreams and sleep, yet is so dominant and sure in waking.

In dreams, our sense of self—our ego, personality or iden­tity—is depicted by our own body, or sometimes simply by the sense of our own existence as an observer. In most dreams our T goes through a series of experiences, just as we do in waking life, seeing things through our physical eyes, touching with our hands, and so on. But occasionally we watch our own body and other people as if from a detached point of bodiless awareness.

If we accept that dreams portray in im­ages our conception of self, then dreams suggest that our identity largely depends upon having a body, its gender, health, quality, the social position we are bom into, and our relationship with others. In fact we know that if a person loses their legs, becomes paralysed, loses childbearing ability or is made redundant, they face an identity crisis. But the bodiless experience of self shows the human possibility of sensing self as having separate existence from the biological processes, one’s state of health and social standing. In its most naked form, the T may be simply a sense of its own existence, without body awareness.

Dreams also show our sense of self, either in the body or naked of it, as surrounded by a community of beings and objects separate from the dreamer, and frequently with a will of their own.

If we place the dreamer in the centre of a circle and put all their dream characters, animals and objects around them; and if we transformed these objects and beings into the things they depicted, such as sexuality, thinking, will emotions, intuition, social pressure, etc., we would see what a diverse mass of influences the ego stands in the middle of. It also becomes obvious that our T sees these things as outside itself in nearly all dreams. Even its own internal urges to love or make love may be shown as external creatures with which it has a multitude of ways to relate.

If we take the word psyche to mean our sense of self, then in our dreams we often see our psyche at war with the sources of its own existence, and trying to find its way through a most extraordinary adventure—the adventure of consciousness. One of the functions of dreams can therefore be thought to be that of aiding the survival of the psyche in facing the multitude of influences in life—and even in death.

See Individuation; dreamer.

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Dream Fairy

This dictionary of India, interpretation of dreams contains over 93 indexed entries.
Indian Interpretation of Dreams

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Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Although mind and body may be a total unity, and the separation in language merely a conve­nience, despite its unity our being has a number of interacting systems.

The action of the hean on the other systems is obvi­ous, and the influence of emotions on the organs is also be­coming obvious. What is not so well established is the impor­tance of the feedback occurring when we gain insight into our own functioning through understanding a dream. Although our being is already a self regulating system, the ability to turn consciousness inwards to make clear aspects of unconscious function appears to increase the efficiency of self regulation. This is shown in the first example of reptiles, lizards, snakes, where David finds a long-standing neck pain and goes through insight into its cause. In this way wc might be seen as a conscious organism which not only reprogrammes mental patterns or habits, but to some extent can renovate or change body efficiency as well. See dream analysis; dream process­ing; the Introduction.

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Dream Fairy

Islamic Dream Interpretation - The extensive indexes and well organized layout of this valuable site make it a useful dream dictionary of types of dreams and their meaning. It is, moreover, the first Islamic guide in English to authentic dream interpretation. It is hoped that this dictionary of dream interpretation will prove useful to students of culture and spirituality, but above all to seekers after truth. This is the most comprehensive report on islamic dream interpretation that you will ever read! Not only does it include timely tips and advice understanding how and why you dream, but also clues to help you zero in on and understand common symbols in dreams.
Dreams are messenger to us from the unknown. They are voices from our collective sub-conscious, warners of deep inner disturbance in the individual psyche, bearer of glad tidings of good things to come, or echoes of happy or sad and long hidden memories. As messenger from the unknown, dreams are often prophetic voices of the future. Hence, they have at times directed the course of the history of nations.

The dream of the prophet Abraham to sacrifice his son, his obedience to the Divine will and his willingness to submit in absolute faith to God made him the first true Muslim and the father of prophets.

The true interpretation of the dreams of the king of Egypt by the prophet Joseph saved both the Egyptians and the children of Israel from famine and death.

The dreams of the Prophet Muhammad, upon him and all the prophets of God be peace and blessings, marked the beginning of his revelation, the noble Qur’fm which changed the face of human history and civilization. Although dreams belong to the domain of personal experience, they are a universal phenomenon, and thus have played a crucial role in the formation of human culture. Throughout recorded human history, dreams and the interpre­tation of dreams have inspired sages and prophets, poets and kings, as well as the most creative psychologist/philosophers of our day.

The science of psycho­analysis of Carl Jung and his school rests on the fact that dreams form the inner diary of every human individual, and hence the need to read and interpret them correctly. This fact has for long been recognized by the sages and prophets of traditional cultures and religions. Not all dreams, however are either true or authentic. Those of the prophets and friends (awliya’s) of God are Divine revelations, true and sacred.

The dreams of pious men and women are almost always true and meaningful. Some dreams come from Satan, and are thus misleading. Others may be caused by physical or psychological problems such as stomach discomfort or emotional disturbance. It is therefore important to distinguish true dreams from empty fantasies, and inspired dreams from satanic insinuations. This is a Divine gift to inspired prophets, holy persons and insightful sages.

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Dream Fairy

Dream interpretation requires vast knowledge, clear perception, and sensi­tivity. Such knowledge must be based on the fundamentals of one’s religion, inner spiritual values, moral and cultural traditions.

The beginner in this field must know that there are two types of dreams: one type that comes from God Almighty, and the second type comes from satan. What is good comes from God Almighty, which is a type of revelation that comes to a righteous person and carries either glad tidings, or warnings. Such dreams also cause one’s heart to reflect upon his actions and to beware of heedlessness.


DreamSymbol.org

The Islamic Dream Interpretation, keys to interpreting your dreams successfully.
Islamic Dream Meanings

Islamic Dream Meanings

On the other hand, they could be a reprimand for an ignoble act one is pondering, or an act one may mistakenly thinks that it is the correct thing to do, or a new friendship that could lead him to hell-fire, or a clarification concerning his treatment of his family and friends and about his business dealings, or they may bring spiritual guidance, etcetera. This is the type of dream which is referred to in God’s Prophet’s sayings: “Atrue dream representsone offorty-six branches of a prophecy.” Both religious and irreligious people may see a true dream that could come true.

The second type of dream connotes deception, cunningness, contriving, jealousy, or a scare, causes pain, depicts any type of eavesdropping, engaging in mundane conversa­tion, the call of one’s mind and desires, or imagination, or occur after eating a heavy late meal or even going to bed hungry, etcetera. This type of dream comes from satan. God’s Prophet (uwbp) has said: ‘As time draws nearer to the con­clusion of this world,dreams will become confused.

The most true of dreams are those ofa truthful person. Thus, if one sees a dream that he dislikes, he should tell no one about it, and he should immediately leave his bed and perform his prayers.” He also said: “The best of ropes is steadfastness to one’s religious life." Interpreting dreams is a process of analyzing the nature of things and their opposing possibilities, connecting their roots, and assembling the fragments of one’s thoughts to better understand his or her real condition. In a dream, one may see things that may connote equilibrium or the opposite, while his passive and inert participation urges him to examine the elements and to awaken his consciousness. Sometimes, the elements themselves may be opaque or unclear. In this case, if one recognizes a person in the dream, perhaps the name of that person, or his trade, or his look, or the meaningofthe individual letters of his name, or their combined numerological value, etcetera, mayprovide a clue to the meaning of one’s dream.


The foundation of all Islamic knowledge is revelation contained in the Qur’aan and the Sunnah.

Since good dreams are also a form of revelation from Allaah, any legitimate attempt to interpret the symbolism of dreams should rely primarily on the symbolism found in the Qur’aan and Sunnah. A dream interpreter must listen to the complete story, and its minute details. He also must investigate and find acceptable religious references for each element in the dream. Ifhe does not fully understand the dream, or if he is unable to find such references, then it is better for him to refrain from making up an interpretation. In that case, he will be giving a religious ruling, though dreams relate to psychology. Indeed, it will be a sin to tell a false interpretation, while one will be rewarded if he remains silent when he does not know the answer. Imam Ibn Seerm was the most renowned master in this science, and he often refrained from interpreting someone’s dream. Perhaps, he would interpret only one out of every forty dreams when askedto do so. Of three out of four such dreams, he used to say: “I do not know the meaning of this dream.” The dream interpreter must investigate the dream and establish its acceptable religious references. It is related that Imam Ibn Seerm used to spend a good part of the day questioning the person about himself, his life, type of work, living condition, and surrounding circumstance, for a dream interpreter is not a prophet and cannot tell about the future.
This dictionary for Islamic dream interpretation contains over 6000 indexed entries.

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Dreamers Dictionary

A Something unique, the beginning of a new event or project.

B Self-isolation, things hidden and not yet known.

C Matter that surrounds spirit, language, throat.

D Symbol for food and growth/development.

E Bridge between body and spirit, call for unity.

F Symbol for the outside and inner world, insight, hope, understanding.

G Weapon, staff, scepter—conquest and/or domination.

H Balanced, self-improvement.

I The human need for safety and severity.

J Adviser, admonishing or threatening index finger.

K Creative vitality, straightforward action, abundant energy.

L Reaching arm, striving for material and/or intellectual fortune.

M Mother, woman, fertility, creative energy.

N Masculine spirit stimulated by the feminine.

O The circle, insurmountable limits of fate.

P Mishaps, bad luck, accidents, disappointments, negative experiences.

Q The result of our action, our language.

R Male energy’, used to pursue our goals.

S Weapons, tools, techniques, and support.

T The cross, origin of your power/energy.

U The cup, the chalice, the passing of life/rime. Success, victory, the search for completeness.

W No specific symbols could be found, but possibly refers the ups and downs of life.

X The ten, checkmarks, crossing out.

Y The unknown, sometimes also sexual needs.

Z Risk decisions, lightning, electricity.

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Being conscious during the dream state represents a high level of mastery. You are realizing your ability to powerfully orchestrate your life that will help you achieve clarity and empowerment in your life.

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My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are able to control the action in your dreams, indicates your growing confidence, high self-esteem and increasing skills. Alternatively, this type of dream may be a way of compensating for a waking situation in which you felt powerless.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

If the Holy Prophet (Sallallaahu-Alayhi-wasallam) is seen as physically deformed or sick or dead then this is a very unpleasant dream. For, it alludes to the observer’s negligence and unmindfulness in mattes of deen. Such a person should immediately resort to repentance.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

It is reasonable and healthy for all of us to have a dream which surprises us or shocks us occasionally. As dreams partly deal with aspects of our urges and fantasies which we do not allow in waking life, such occasional dreams are safety valves. It is healthy to be able to allow a wide range of dream experience, from the holy to the deeply sexual; from outright aggression to tender love. In fact we gain an idea of the depth and broadness of our own soul—whether or not our psyche is narrow—from the range of dreams we experience.

If obscene dreams assail and worry us again and again, however, then there is a problem in the way we are relating to ourself and the exterior world. Psychotherapeutic counselling might help.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In attempting to put together the information gathered from viewing thousands of dreams—not simply at face value, but explored in depth through the emo­tions and direct associations of the dreamer—a philosophy or view of life arises. It suggests that our birth as a physical and psychological being is a paradox. We are unique, and at the same time a common undifferentiated person. Psychologically we have our identity out of the lives of thousands of humans who preceded us and left the gift of language, of music, an, of concepts and information. Our mental life, our consciousness, is in some very real way formed out of what they left from their life. Our consciousness has been hewn out of the rock of possibilities by the love, the struggle and pain, the endeavour and wit of their lives. Particularly our psyche has been shaped by or modelled on our parents, and the traces in their life, unknown though they may be, of their parents, backwards for many generations.

Our identity is given to us by the humans who raise us. This sense of self arises because we are treated as if we were a self. This, with language, is the creative matrix of our self awareness.

The giving of a name is therefore a miracle which acts as a nucleus around which the many mental connections can be made which form our self image. Perhaps this is why giving the name in baptism is seen as a holy rite in Chris­tianity.

Our conscious personality can live without ever becoming aware of its connections with other lives except as it meets them in everyday affairs. That its existence has depended upon what was given by countless other lives—that humans constantly create each other, consciously and unconsciously, through the dynamic flux of communication—might never be realised. That one’s own life is also a part of this creative process, this sea of living consciousness, might never be known. Nevertheless, each individual life constantly takes pan in the collective, negatively or positively. This is not a mystical thing, but is plainly observable. From the point of view of dreams, if our life has given nothing in deed, in love, in rearing of children, in ideas or art, or in common human­ity, we are dead—during life and afterwards. Giving and re­ceiving, kinship and symbiosis, growth and decay are the fun­damentals of the living process according to dreams.

At death, we face a very real end, a real death. There is no magical escape from this. All that we have been, all we have become, all we gathered and won is lost—finished. But the paradox occurs again. Dreams suggest that out of all we gave of ourself, out of all we received from the being of others, we are recreated in a realm of consciousness. This may mean that we continue as living influences in the lives of those who still live. But the suggestion is that something more than this oc­curs.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In attempting to understand our dreams, it is imponant to honour their drama or plot. Dreams appear to be very specific in the way they use the characters, objects and environs occurring in them.

Example: I was walking up a steep hill on a sunny day when my husband came running down the hill with blood pouring from his right arm. He couldn’t stop running. As he passed me he called to me for help. I was happy and peaceful and ignored him. I calmly watched him running fast down the hill, then continued on my way’ (Joyce C). Out of the infinite number of situations Joyce could have dreamt about, this was the one produced. Why? There are many factors which appear to determine what we dream. How events of the day influ­enced us; what stage of personal growth we are meeting—we might be in the stage of struggling for independence; prob­lems being met; relationships, past business such as child­hood traumas still to be integrated. And so on.

If Joyce had dreamt she and her husband were walking up the hill the whole message of the dream would have been different.

If we can accept that dream images are, as Freud stated, a form of thinking, then the change in imagery would be a changed concept.

If the language of dreams is expressed in its images, then the meaning stated is specific to the imagery used.

In processing our dreams, it is therefore profitable to look at the plot to see what it suggests. It can be helpful to change the situation, as we have done with Joyce s. Imagining Joyce walking up the hill on a sunny day, arm in arm with her husband, suggests a happy relationship. This emphasises the situation of independence and lack of support for her hus­band which appears in the real dream. Seeing our dreams as if they were snatches from a film or play, and asking ourself what feelings and human situations they depict, can aid us to clarify them. As a piece of drama, Joyce’s dream says she sees, but does not respond to, her husband’s plight.

Our internal ‘dream producer’ has an amazing sense of the subtle meanings of movement, positioning, and relationship between the elements used. And some of these are subtle.

A way of becoming more aware of what information our dream contains is to use visualisation. Sit comfonably and imagine yourself back in the dream. Replay it just as it was. Remember the whole thing slowly, going through it again while awake. As you do so, be aware of what it feels like in each scene or event. What do the interactions suggest? What does it feel like in the other roles? We can even practise this with other peo­ple’s dreams.

If we imagine ourself in Joyce’s dream, and replay it just as she describes it, we may arrive at a feeling of detachment from the husband.

If we stand in the husband’s role we may feel a great need which is not responded to as we go down hill fast*. In this way we gather a great deal of unspoken’ information from dreams.

Looking at our own dreams in this way can be more diffi­cult, simply because we do not always want to see what is being said about ourself. See amplification; dream process­ing; postures, movement, body language; word analysis of dreams; settings.

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Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)

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Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In psychodrama there is no in­terpretation’ of a dream.

The dreamer unravels the meaning of the dream by acting it out with the help of others.

The dreamer acts the main role of him or herself, and directs the helpers in the other roles. In dramatising and exploring the dream in this way, the obvious as well as the hidden meaning, associations and emotions are made clear.

To finish, the dreamer is encouraged to take the dream forward, altering it to what feels more adequate and satisfying. This gives the person opportunity to express and enact what was absent in the dream, and provides release from recurring dreams, and catharsis where necessary.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same. It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing.

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Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)

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My Dream Interpretation

Recurring dreams can be highly useful and important to analyze. They happen for one of two reasons: (1) they reflect an unhealthy pattern that you have fallen into in real life, and they are trying to show you that your behaviour is not helping you be happy. Or, (2) they represent unresolved feelings, such as anger or sadness over a past situation that you have not healed from. In many recurring dreams, your sleeping self is trying to solve a problem - or confront an emotion - that you are unable to face in real life. Whatever the subject of your recurring dream is, you can be sure it is reflecting something in your current life situation, even if the dream takes you back in time. Use the Dream Dictionary to analyze the major symbols and events in your dream, to piece together its message. Think carefully about what in your life might be causing you continual stress or worry.

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The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Repetitive dreams are a clear message from our dreaming mind that we are stuck in a particular mind set or behavioural cycle. • If a dream continues to repeat itself, it is worth exploring it’s meaning as it needs your conscious understanding and action in order to resolve something in your emotional make-up. • Recurring dreams can be a trauma relieving response to the original event that triggered them.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Considering that each of us has four or five periods of dreaming each night, most of our dreams are forgotten. But for people who observe family or friends regu­larly remembering a dream, and yet themselves are seldom if ever able to recall one, the question arises as to why such a wide divergence occurs.

There are many different reasons why dreams may be for­gotten.

The most obvious is that we do not give enough atten­tion to our dreaming process. When people become intrigued by what they might be dreaming, and develop a motivation to remember, they frequently start recalling several dreams a week. From this standpoint, the reason why some people have always remembered might be that they have always been ei­ther intrigued or anxious about their nightly dramas.

The way we rise in the morning has an effect upon this type of memory.

If our attention is immediately turned out­wards on waking, there is little hope of recalling a dream unless it has great power, as might a nightmare. Spending a few moments leaving our mind open to memory aids recall. Any visual, or even muscular activity, will fill consciousness with new and powerful impressions which might obliterate the subtler impressions of dreaming. Rorschach suggested not opening the eyes, and remaining physically still. Tests also showed that passage of time, even a few minutes, between dreaming and attempting to remember causes many dreams to fragment and be lost. So any attempts to remember need one to record the dream quickly, by speaking it to one’s bedmate, using a tape recorder by one’s bed, or writing it down.

Some dreams have rather misty or fragmentary imagery and theme, while others are clear, concise and dynamic. These latter are more easily remembered. There may be times when we sleep with longer periods of wakefulness, perhaps due to feeling cold, or uncomfonable in a strange bed, which cause us to remember as we are nearer consciousness. Be­cause dreams occur in cycles during the night, if something wakes us during a dream cycle the memory is easier, if only because less time has elapsed since occurrence. So another method of captunng a dream is to have one’s alarm gently sound prior to the time one usually wakes.

The last hour or so of sleep includes a long period of dreaming, so waking in this period with intent to remember can often capture the quarry.

Thereare also psychological reasons for forgetfulness. Dreams often deal with past areas of experience which we do not wish to remember, or would rather not be aware of.

If we find it difficult to feel emotions, or feel uncomfonable with them, it is highly likely we repress dream memory, as dreams have a base of high feelings. Experiments have shown that during dreaming our heartbeat, body movements and breath­ing frequently reflect intensified emotions. Also, research into what areas of the brain produce dreaming suggest that dreams may be from the ‘visceral brain’, which is largely non verbal.

If temperamentally we find feeling qualities a foreign lan­guage, connecting with a dream would need to be a learnt skill.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In 1937 through the use of the electroencephalograph (EEG) measuring tiny electrical brain impulses, Loomis and his associates discovered that the form of brainwaves changes with the onset of sleep.

The next leap forward in understanding came when Aserinsky and Kleitman found rapid eye movements (REM) in 1953. In 1957 the REM were linked with dreaming. This defined sleep into two differ­ent observable states, REM sleep, and NREM (non-rapid eye movement or non-rem) sleep. Within NREM three different stages have been identified. These are defined by the different EEG patterns of electrical activity in the brain. They are mea­sured by the height (amplitude) of the brain waves and fre­quency of up and down movement. There are also electrical changes occurring in the muscles (measured using an electro- myograph or EMG), and in movement of the eyeballs (mea­sured using an electro-oculograph or EOG).

While awake the height is low and frequency fast. As we relax prior to sleep the EEG shifts to what are called alpha waves, at 8 to 12 cps (cycles per second). Stage one of sleep is the transition between this drowsy state of alpha waves to sleeping, in which theta waves occur, at 3 to 7 cps. In this first stage we experience random images and thoughts. This lasts about 10 minutes, followed by stage two, in which ‘sleep spindles’ occur which have 12 to 14 cps on the EEG. These last from 1/2 to 2 seconds, with K complexes following, which are slow large EEG waves. About half our sleep period is spent in this second stage of sleep. Deep sleep is reached when our brain exhibits delta waves, with 1/2 to 2 cps.

After approximately an hour and a half from falling into deep sleep, an exciting change occurs. We return to level two and REM occur. Suddenly the brain is alert and active, though the person is asleep and difficult to wake. This level has been called paradoxical sleep because of this fact. Voluntary mus­cular activity is suppressed and the body is essentially paralysed. Morrison has pointed out that, although the brain is transmitting full muscular activity messages, these are usu­ally suppressed by an area of the brain in the pons. But bursts of short actions occur, such as rapid eyeball jerks, twitches of the muscles, changes in the size of the pupil, contractions in the middle ear, and erection of the penis. It may be that similar excitation occurs in the vagina. Also, autonomic storms’ occur dunng which large erratic changes occur in heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate and in other auto­nomic nervous system functions. These are the changes ac­companying our dreams.

If we slept for eight hours, a typical pattern would be to pass into delta sleep, stay there for about 70 to 90 minutes, then return to stage two and dream for about five minutes. We then move back into delta sleep, stay for a short period and shift back to level two, but without dreaming, then back into level three.

The next return to stage two is longer, almost an hour, with a period of dreaming lasting about 19 minutes, and also a short period of return to waking. There is only one short period of return to stage three sleep which occurs nearly four hours after falling asleep. From there on we remain in level two sleep, with three or four lengthening periods of dreaming, and returns to brief wakefulness.

The average amount of body shifting is once every 15 minutes.

1- In undergoing 205 hours of sleep deprivation, four healthy males showed various physiological and psychological changes. Some of these were headache, lack of concentra­tion, hallucination, memory loss, tremor and, in some, paranoia. In all cases one night’s sleep restored normal functioning.

2- One in ten people who complain of excessive daytime drowsiness suffer from sleep apnoea, which is a stoppage of breathing while asleep.

3- A condition called narcolepsy causes sufferers to fall asleep at inappropriate times—while making love, walk­ing, playing tennis, working.

4- As we age we usually sleep less. Our REM sleep in partic­ular decreases sharply.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

An elephant symbolises a foreigner who is despotic, powerful and vehement. He has no compassion_striking fear into the hearts of people.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Rasoolullah (Sallallaahu-alayhi-wasallam) has said : “Whosoever sees me in his dream he has truly seen me. For, the devil is unable to assume my form”.

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

An unresolved problem or an incomplete event of destiny; when resolved, the dreams will cease

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Words are themselves symbols of objects, ideas, or feelings. Whether we look at mathematical equations, a film, a novel, or a business logo, each involves the use of symbols. When we look at a thermometer we lose sight of it as a real object, and see it as temperature. Through­out our everyday life we use things symbolically without no­ticing.

A name on the label of goods may depict quality to us.

A face can represent love or brutality. In the struggle towards human awareness, and its increasingly subtle use of symbols such as language to think and express with, there must have been stages of development. This is a side of ‘history’ seldom given attention, yet very important. Perhaps our dream think­ing’ is using an earlier form of using symbols, one which might have been more an everyday event prior to language.

Even though we exist as an individual integrated with today’s world, our earlier levels of thinking still exist. Uncon­sciously we still see the thermometer as temperature; the car as status, independence or ease in getting to work; inside our house as an expression of ourself—if we didn’t we would not take pains to make it nice for guests. Through these uncon­scious feeling connections or symbolic views we have of things, dreams create their store of images and scenes. Pro­cessing a dream is an attempt to discover what values we ourself unconsciously place upon the people, animals, objects and situations around us. See unconscious.

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Never interpret your dreams intellectually! Reasoning creates distance. Such distance often leads us to misunderstand symbols and whole dreams. Symbols are dealt with by the heart and not by the intellect, because their effect lies in moving something emotionally. Dreams therefore must always be approached on an emotional level. We can often recognize intuitively—and very quickly—what a dream is trying to tell us. Bring a little bit of your heart to every dream analysis and you will gain a lot.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

It must be borne in mind that the most authentic dreams are the ones observed in the latter part of the night and during Qayloolah (sleeping at midday ) and during the day. Dreams during the fruit-ripening season and fruit-selling season are also very potent.

The most inopportune time wherein dreams hardly have any significant meaning is during the winter season and when rain is imminent.

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

It must be borne in mind that the most authentic dreams are the ones observed in the latter part of the night and during Qayloolah (sleeping at midday ) and during the day. Dreams during the fruit-ripening season and fruit-selling season are also very potent.

The most inopportune time wherein dreams hardly have any significant meaning is during the winter season and when rain is imminent.

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Venting dreams represent your subconscious mind’s attempt to assist you with the process of cleaning out the old in order to make room for the new. You may be playing out a a frightening or anxiety provoking scenario in order to come to terms with how you would handle it, or to conquer it. Venting dreams usually occur as nightmares or frightmares, anxiety dreams that leave you feeling shaken up. Venting dreams are showing you what we are ready to release. See Types of Dreams (Introduction).

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About Dream Interpretation

Dreams! What do they mean? You probably recognize a connection between the dream world and the “real” world, but did you know that you can actually do things to nurture your dream life? The bulk of this intriguing volume is an alphabetical directory of the psychological and mystical meanings of various dream symbols, from angels to zoos.

For example, if you are chased in your dream, this will show a sense of insecurity. Dreams Interpreted, each page reveals the fantastic meanings of quotidian objects and occurrences that surface in your reveries. Make a note of it when you wake up so you do not forget your dream.

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About Dream Interpretation

Recurrent dream themes often start at a young age, but can begin at any time, and persist for the rest of one’s life.

The theme of missing an exam, to take one example, commonly begins during college years, when the stress of performing well may be more intense than ever before. However, this theme may then carry forward as a recurring dream for many years, even as one moves on to a career.

The “missing the exam” dream may reappear the night before an important job interview or an evaluation at work.

The circumstances may change, but the same feelings of stress, and the desire to perform well, can trigger the relevant recurrent dream. Theorists suggest that these themes may be considered “scripts” (Spoormaker, 2008) or perhaps “complexes” (Freud 1950); as soon as your dream touches any aspect of the theme, the full script unfolds in completion. Dream theorists generally agree that recurring dreams are connected to unresolved problems in the life of the dreamer. In a previous post I discussed the idea that dreams often portray a Central Image, a powerful dream image that contextualizes a certain emotion or conflict for the dreamer.

The Tidal Wave dream is an example of a Central Image that represents overwhelming emotions such as helplessness and fear.

The Tidal Wave dream is a common dream to experience following trauma or abuse, and often becomes a recurrent theme that reflects a person’s struggling with integrating and accepting the trauma. Resolution of this theme over time is a good sign that the trauma has been confronted and adaptively integrated in the psyche. Empirical research has also supported findings that resolution of a recurrent dream is associated with improved well-being (Zadra, 1996). This is one way that keeping track of your dreams can be extremely informative and helpful in a therapeutic, or even self-help, process.


Many people have the same or a similar dream many times, over either a short period of time or their lifetime. Recurring dreams usually mean there is something in your life you’ve not acknowledged that is causing stress of some sort.

The dream repeats because you have not corrected the problem. Another theory is that people who experience recurring dreams have some sort of trauma in their past they are trying to deal with. In this case, the dreams tend to lessen with time. Nightmares are dreams that are so distressing they usually wake us up, at least partially. Nightmares can occur at any age but are seen in children with the most frequency. Nightmares usually cause strong feelings of fear, sadness or anxiety. Their causes are varied. Some medications cause nightmares (or cause them if you discontinue the medication abruptly). Traumatic events also cause nightmares. Treatment for recurring nightmares usually starts with interpreting what is going on in the dream and comparing that with what is happening in the person’s life. Then, the person undergoes counseling to address the problems that are presumably causing the nightmare. Some sleep centers offer nightmare therapy and counseling. Another method of treating nightmares is through lucid dreaming. Through lucid dreaming, the dreamer can confront his or her attacker and, in some cases, end the nightmares.

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Having written a dream down, by using highlighting pens to make all matching words the same colour, one can immediately see the main issues in some dreams.

Example: ‘We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms. It goes up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up . In one dream I try to go up but the children are scared for me. They plead, ‘Don’t go up Mum, just forget them”. Then I wake. In the next dream I wait till they are asleep. Half way up_ I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. Then I woke’ (Ann H). Ann’s dream theme recurs, so is important to her. In marking just some of the words we see that the ‘up’ or go up’ is important. Childhood fears hold Ann back for a while, but she dares to climb.

If we look at the entries for climb and stairs, we see they depict taking steps towards ex­ploring the unknown, daring to explore one’s potential or opportunities.

By marking the words in this way we might also highlight certain statements otherwise hidden in the dream. Particularly watch out for the connections with the word T, such as I want, I do, I will, I have, I know, I cannot, etc. Example: ‘1 want to withdraw.’ I was full of sadness but was trying not to show it.’ ‘1 felt keyed up and ready to fight.’ Taking such statements out of context and looking for connections with everyday feelings oi situations often throws considerable light on the dream.

If what you realise is then considered in con­nection with the plot of the dream, the viewpoint your uncon­scious has on the situation might become evident.

For in­stance, the statement ‘I felt keyed up’ occurred within a classroom, and helped the dreamer understand the anger gen­erated at school. See amplification; plot of the dream; the comments on dream processing in the Introduction; dream processing; postures, movement, body language; settings; symbols and dreams.

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